Hollyhock seeds

A forum dedicated to perennials, the ornamental plants that last from year to year adding colour, shape and fragrance to the garden.

Moderators: Forum_mod, Pam, Luzy, Bulbinella

Hollyhock seeds

Postby GoldenWattle » Fri Mar 11, 2011 7:44 pm

I bought a packet of hollyhock seeds and I'm ready to pot on or plant out. I don't know that colour flowers each will produce. I'd prefer to know what colours I have before I plant out. I'm guessing that my best option is to pot on, but what size pot should I use? Is a 30cm diameter pot adequate? If I plant out on a raised mound, would I be able to move the mound after it flowers? Does anyone know if they cope with root shock?

Cheers,
GoldenWattle (#)
User avatar
GoldenWattle
Gardening Sage
 
Posts: 1100
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2010 7:40 pm
Location: Melbourne - NE Suburbs

Re: Hollyhock seeds

Postby daffy » Sat Jun 11, 2011 2:40 pm

I think your best option will be to pot on to pots 25cm deep and greater than 18cm diameter. Hollyhocks can get to 1.5m.
Then plant the pot into the garden soil in the location you want....if the colours are wrong you can lift the pot out and move.
Once they have finished, remove from pot and plant into location for next season.
Save seeds, label for colour and sow next Autumn.
Classic old favourites!, plant with foxgloves and delphiniums!
Never believe anyone who says your proposed garden is too big!!!

Remember, treat others how you would like to be treated.
User avatar
daffy
Gardening Sage
 
Posts: 1084
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2004 2:35 pm
Location: New England

Re: Hollyhock seeds

Postby SunnyGarden » Sat Jun 02, 2012 10:09 pm

Hi,

I did have Hollyhocks in my garden in Germany. They are growing/flowering only from May to October there, so each Winter they were gone. And we did have very cold Winter where I used to live.

It is not a problem to cut them back and replace them in another spot. Just make sure they getting enough water if its hot/dry.

I finally found some seeds here too (I missed the Hollyhocks very much) and will start to grow them here too, planning a cottage garden.

Did you already have some success with your trials? Appreciate a feedback very much.

Cheers from SE QLD Coast.
User avatar
SunnyGarden
Lawn trimmer
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2012 6:08 pm
Location: SE QLD Coast

Re: Hollyhock seeds

Postby Pam » Sun Jun 03, 2012 6:15 am

Trying to raise them to flowering size in pots is not something I would do, GW, as they're likely to be far sturdier, longer lasting plants if they develop in the ground rather than pots.

If its absolutely imperative to do it, however, then the bigger the pots' diameter, the better chance the roots will have to spread adequately to support the plant and prevent it growing too spindly as it would tend to do in too small a pot.

As Daffy suggests, burying the pots would probably be the best option.

As an aside, if a particular colour is what you're after, some of the mail order seed companies offer individual colours or colour ranges. It's a long time since I have needed to order any, so am not sure of who might be your best option, but I'm sure if you decided to try this option in the future others would be able to help with suggestions.
User avatar
Pam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 14418
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 1:06 pm
Location: Bundaberg, Qld

Re: Hollyhock seeds

Postby daffy » Sun Jun 03, 2012 7:45 am

Once planted and growing I would not move.
Your options are to pot,(which I wouldn't do, either Pam) they will get over 1m in height, or plant, wait to flower, label for colour, collect seed and plant accordingly the following season. They look great a mixed group in the garden anyway.Or go to ebay and buy specific colour seeds.
Never believe anyone who says your proposed garden is too big!!!

Remember, treat others how you would like to be treated.
User avatar
daffy
Gardening Sage
 
Posts: 1084
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2004 2:35 pm
Location: New England

Re: Hollyhock seeds

Postby GoldenWattle » Sun Jun 03, 2012 1:58 pm

I had one plant that survived to planting out, but it hasn't done much. It's only about 10cm tall (been in the ground almost a year if not more), although it has several leaves on it and generally it looks healthy. Maybe needs better soil. I'm having tree loppers over during the week to remove a boxelder maple and a conifer which are on either side of it, so it'll get more sun.

Cheers,
GoldenWattle (#)
User avatar
GoldenWattle
Gardening Sage
 
Posts: 1100
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2010 7:40 pm
Location: Melbourne - NE Suburbs


Return to Perennials

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron