Adding red/orange flowering colour

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Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby zaza » Sat Oct 15, 2011 8:43 pm

Hi All

I'm keen for any suggestions on flowering plants to give colour to my garden. I'm located near Canberra, on acreage in bush (so can't do Californian poppy), with heavy frost and at times dry conditions. I've been trying to stick to the autumn colours as a theme. I've got the green bushes, trees & next is leucadendrons to give more leaf colour. So what is left is the gaps for flowers.

Ideally Californian poppy would have been perfect but for the prolific self seeding nature.

I'd be grateful for any suggestions. In the past someone has done agapanthas & bearded iris. Is there anything else? :?
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby grevs1 » Sat Oct 15, 2011 11:12 pm

hi

first welcome to this forum..:-)

how about bulbs..maybe tulips and daffodils..there are so many lovely ones which multiply nicely over the years and give you lovely spring/summer colour ??? :-? or even rhododendrons..they sure can take heavy frosts ! :D
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby zaza » Sun Oct 16, 2011 8:38 pm

Thanks grevs1. I was thinking of bulbs as some daffodils just appeared this year and looked great. Can i ask - with mulching do you have to remember where the bulb patches are and go thin? mulching didn't happen this year as busy with a baby but just wondering how it works with mulching. or maybe it is small pockets of bulbs next to other plants...

And - thanks for the welcome - I am hoping to learn heaps here :D
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby bubba louie » Mon Oct 17, 2011 12:22 am

The humble Marigold?
“Just living is not enough... One must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.”
Hans Christian Andersen
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby greg.l » Mon Oct 17, 2011 6:49 pm

Geums have good red/orange colours. oriental poppies also have good red colours. There are quite a few daisies that come in red, including chrysanthymums and dahlias.
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby zaza » Mon Oct 17, 2011 8:57 pm

Thanks greg.1 and bubba louie - are these flowers annuals or perennials? from searching the net marigolds seem to be either, so am confused. ideally I'd like perennials as that seems to be less work and there will be something there all the time (even if just leaves)
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby grevs1 » Thu Oct 20, 2011 10:17 pm

or have you thought of maybe groundcover grevilleas ?? some can take frost quite well and they flower in winter/spring when the rest of the garden just wakes up..... like cherry pie or ember glow ....there are a few red, reddish or orange flowering ones to choose from and they are in for good..saves work !.. :D
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby zaza » Sun Oct 23, 2011 8:19 pm

chrysanthemums are a good idea I'm checking into that. I've seen some pom pom flower head varieties that I love (ie cut flowers not plants). Yes, I like the ground grevilleas. I've got one so may add some more because they do well here. thx
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby Pam » Sun Oct 23, 2011 8:46 pm

coreopsis 'red devil' sounds like it would suit your needs well if you can get it, zaza.
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby karyn » Sun Oct 23, 2011 9:08 pm

I'm not terribly knowledgeable on exotics but I'm wondering if nasturtiums (sorry Cosmic!!) and calendula might be good? They self seed and are pretty hardy here - I just mow them when they look scrappy! I have an old Digger's seed sowing manual / garden annual and the rudbeckia's, poppies and californian poppies look great in the pictures, but I don't know if they self seed.
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby Handed » Tue Sep 03, 2013 12:22 am

I live in a similar climate to yours on the Northern Tablelands. You didn't say what your soil type is, mine here is clay loam, the things that don't do well here without modifying the soil are those that need excellent sharp drainage (alpines), or low pH. Also those that are too frost sensitive and flower too early like Lachenalias.

I have one border that is dedicated to Autumn tones, and these plants do well and maintain themselves either as perrennials or self seeding annuals without being invasive: Daylilies (in Canberra you can grow all varieties, even the ones that go dormant in Winter). I'd recommend Primal Scream (stunning bright glowing orange)), Stella D'Oro (yellow mini long-flowering), Maleny Sizzler (showy red-orange), Gold Baron (intense yellow-gold), Crikey (yellow edged and patterned in burnt orange, very floriferous), Marse Connell (burgundy spider with star shaped yellow throat), So Many Stars (cream with burgundy star patterned eye), Avante Garde (orange/peach bitone), Lil Red Wagon ( bright red mini), Echo Canyon (tall huge spidery soft red and yellow blooms) and Noble Warrior (vibrant red with contrasting green throat).

Other that do well for me and stay put without invasive behaviour are geums, daffodils, ranunculas, bearded iris, the trumpet, trumpet hybrid, Asiatic or Tiger liliums, crocus Yellow Mammoth, Sternbergia, Alstroemerias (Sara, Red Fury and Yellow King are great), Sprekelia, Nerines, Lycoris, Bulbinella latifolia, Heuchera, Bloomeria, Tree Peonies (such as Kinshe or Alice Harding), Scabiosa atropurpurea, Calendula, Aquilegia, Gladioli (a species G. dalenii, very showy in late Autumn when nothing else is in flower),and Epimedium.

I've had limited success only with tulips, Oriental poppies, Dahlias and Eremurus. Most tulips die out after a few years, I don't bother to dig them, however the variety Falcon seems to be multiplying, though that may be the shaded protected location. Dahlias are drainage fussy so in my soil eventually they get a wet winter and die, unless you dig them up and move them around. Oriental poppies and Eremurus are hard to establish but tough and beautiful once you've got them going.

Frost sensitive annual self-seeders like Cosmos, Marigold (Tagetes) and Nasturtiums are fantastic, but will die out in the garden despite the abundance of seed they drop if they have the bad timing to germinate before a late frost. That's ok if you remember to save some seed in envelopes so you can put them back again.

Hope this helps.

I'd watch Crocosmia, it hasn't been invasive here but it has that potential so I hear. Phlomis is good but can get out of hand. Stay away from runnering things like Physalis, I can't get rid of it and it even comes up in the paths.
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Re: Adding red/orange flowering colour

Postby zaza » Sun Apr 20, 2014 12:34 am

Thanks Handed. I've just checked this all out and have found dutch gladioli which seem to have a long flowering time and also be under 1 metre (most of my garden is in terraced walls). So I think i will do this. I did end up getting chrysanthemums and they have been spectacularly successful. I sourced them from show growers and have the spider varieties in pink, orange, dark bronze & yellow. I must have 20-25 of this type alone (also have single pink pom poms) and it can be a lot of wolrk to debud, but they look amazing. they have survived cold winters (including snow), very hot summers, low water. each plant makes at least 3 more, so have been giving away more than i keep. If I could post some pictures here i would.

I have also been putting in freesias, but they tend to fall over so a bit disappointed. Thanks for sharing your experience on tulips. being near the ACT, I am always tempted, but find it hard to believe they would work well.

So Gladys i think are next ...
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