help me identify this plant! runners, grouped pink flowers

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help me identify this plant! runners, grouped pink flowers

Postby jbie » Sat Aug 19, 2006 12:27 pm

i've got the loveliest flowering plant growing in my rental property's raised garden bed, but only surviving at one end - the other 2/3 of its length is dead or dying..

i'd like to identify it so that i can see if there's a chance i can salvage the dying 2/3, or, to get the flourishing 1/3 to "spread" along the whole bed length.

i've attached a pic, you can see it's in pink flower (it's late winter/spring now) in clumps, dark green glossy ivy-shaped leaves, and appears to be growing along multiple runners..

Image
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Postby sara » Sat Aug 19, 2006 12:37 pm

geranium or pelagonium (I can never tell the difference), probably brought out on a ship in 1946 by a war bride and carefully nurtured on deck in a pot for 6 weeks.
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Postby midgin » Sat Aug 19, 2006 2:54 pm

Ellengray, you sound like a 'bit of a romantic'... :wink:
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Postby sara » Sat Aug 19, 2006 3:17 pm

I have some of those geraniums, exactly the same, in my garden that were indeed brought out on a ship in 1946, carfully nursed in a pot for 6 weeks, by a war bride who became the wife of the manager of Cadbury chocolate factory (cue willy wonka) who lvied in this house for 50 years. :) So now all geraniums for me are war bride flowers. :)

PS jbie - those things are the absolute best for taking cuttings, dipping in some rooting gel, setting into a moist pot, and watching them take off. You can take lots of strkings and create a thriving monster again. :)
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Postby Pokie » Sat Aug 19, 2006 3:55 pm

That is an Ivy Geranium (Trailing Pelargonium). Take some cuttings. :)They grow so easily from them.
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Postby jbie » Sat Aug 19, 2006 6:12 pm

wow, thanks! i'll go read up on propagation..

though, i would like to rejuvenate that raised bed by late spring, it's a bit unsightly right now, all dead/dying leaves and runners.. i don't suppose the cuttings will strike up to any purpose by then?
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Postby Sam » Sat Aug 19, 2006 7:41 pm

They're also nice in hanging baskets and window boxes because of the trailing habit.
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Postby Ann » Sun Aug 20, 2006 1:53 pm

Def one of the easiest to grow and I love the colour. :D I don't have that colour, but I do have a couple of baskets :D LIke many other plants, take cuttings and tip prune to keep the flowers coming and the plants in check. :D
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Postby Modesty » Sun Aug 20, 2006 5:24 pm

you could cut it back quite hard and dig in compost and water with fish emulsion. They grow pretty quickly.

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Postby Ann » Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:22 pm

Actually I heard that Geraniums, including the trailing ones, do better when not overfed and like a bit if sand in the mix. Mine are like that, kept lean and hungry :cry: and do well. :D The best ones seem to be on back fences and telegraph poles, in places where they are definitely neglected :lol: :lol:
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Postby Pokie » Mon Aug 28, 2006 8:59 pm

Cut mine back 2 weekends ago, and left next to a sunny wall. They are shooting already. They will climb up the railings on the verandah. :)
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Postby cordelia » Tue Aug 29, 2006 3:34 am

Pokie, how on earth do yours survive? Anything in the geranium family dies here in the -11 freezes. My rose-scented one just survived the worst freeze because it was under the cat....
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Postby Pokie » Tue Aug 29, 2006 4:22 pm

Mine survive because I have them in pots, next to a hot wall. :D

Also, I keep them dry in winter - hardly water them at all.
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Postby Luzy » Tue Aug 29, 2006 6:02 pm

Umm... codelia - under the cat... ? :shock: The mind boggles :lol: :lol:
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Postby Pokie » Tue Aug 29, 2006 6:03 pm

:lol: Not surprised it doesnt grow again! :shock:
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Postby Pam » Tue Aug 29, 2006 6:27 pm

Ellengray, I absolutely MUST have a piece of your historical ivy geranium, PLEASE????? I can't offer my firstborn, but there must be something?
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Postby cordelia » Thu Aug 31, 2006 6:12 am

Under the cat is the only place that doesn't freeze.... Actually, the cat sleeps on a chair, and the geranium hides under the overlap of the cushion, so the cat smells good and the plant stays unfrozen.
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Postby Pokie » Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:45 am

:lol: Everyones happy. :)
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Postby cordelia » Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:54 am

Pam,
And why can't you offer your firstborn? What's your excuse? Come to think of it, it is probably a good thing, cos ellengray would have no time to look after anyone else while she is establishing her garden!
I felt the same about wanting some historical geranium...isn't it a lovely story?
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Postby Pam » Sat Sep 02, 2006 6:05 am

Cordelia, it truly is a lovely story! As for the firstborn, she was a 'teenager' for about 3 weeks and has been a thorough joy for the rest of her life - I've become quite attached!! :lol: And besides, she's cold-blooded and would suffer terribly in Tasmanian winters!
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