Grass trees

A forum for discussions and questions related to propagating and caring for Australian native plants.

Moderators: Forum_mod, Pam, jack

Grass trees

Postby HorticulturallyChallenged » Sat Nov 01, 2008 11:17 pm

We have 2 or 3 grass trees in the centre of our garden which have had these magnificent stick things (for want of a better description) sticking out of them since we moved in. One of them has grown kinda curly and it looks fantastic. They now seem to be getting a bit old and the odd bird has landed on a couple and snapped them off.

There's no sign of any new ones growing. Is there anything I can do to promote their growth? Are these things that just grow sometimes?
User avatar
HorticulturallyChallenged
Propagator
 
Posts: 40
Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2007 1:46 pm
Location: Canberra ACT

Re: Black Boys

Postby Pam » Sun Nov 02, 2008 6:02 am

They're flower stems. You can expect new ones next year.
User avatar
Pam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 14418
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 1:06 pm
Location: Bundaberg, Qld

Re: Black Boys

Postby Grasshopper » Thu Nov 06, 2008 6:05 am

How lucky you are to have those--they take so long to grow--I love them
Grasshopper
Head Curator
 
Posts: 775
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 3:55 pm
Location: Port Stephens

Re: Black Boys

Postby tannas » Mon Mar 23, 2009 1:32 pm

hey i agree, your so lucky to have grass trees! ive heard burning them promotes flowers, not quite sure on the technique be funy to watch hehe :twisted:
User avatar
tannas
Head Gardener
 
Posts: 126
Joined: Mon Mar 16, 2009 8:22 pm
Location: Gippsland, VIC

Re: Black Boys

Postby Pam » Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:44 pm

I wouldn't agree that burning promotes flowering. It's certainly not a reliable way of inducing it.
User avatar
Pam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 14418
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 1:06 pm
Location: Bundaberg, Qld

Re: Grass trees

Postby Phil Hansen » Wed Mar 25, 2009 1:37 pm

Burning is known to promote flowering in Xanthorea spp. After the Anakie fires a couple of years ago (near Geelong), all the Xanthorea in the Steigletz National Park sent up flower shoots within a couple of months, thousands of them, really an amazing sight. Not that I would recommend doing that in a domestic garden!!! :?
PHIL HANSEN

Dyslexics are teople poo
Phil Hansen
Curator
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2008 11:26 pm
Location: Castlemaine (Vic)

Re: Grass trees

Postby Pam » Wed Mar 25, 2009 1:53 pm

Well there you go! I knew it was useful for regeneration of a tired plant Phil, but had never heard of them being used for flowering.

I stand corrected, Tannas. They can sure get up a burn when they get going.
User avatar
Pam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 14418
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 1:06 pm
Location: Bundaberg, Qld

Re: Grass trees

Postby Grasshopper » Wed Mar 25, 2009 2:13 pm

The Gymea Lillies also flower after fires as well.
Grasshopper
Head Curator
 
Posts: 775
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 3:55 pm
Location: Port Stephens

Re: Grass trees

Postby Tropicgardener » Wed Mar 25, 2009 8:15 pm

Burning also helps them to survive transplant shock. I found this out when I transplanted some from a house block about to be levelled near my brother's home on the NSW south coast. I did an experiment and lost all that were not burnt whilst approximately 90% of the burnt ones survived.
Tropicgardener
Senior Curator
 
Posts: 657
Joined: Sun Jan 07, 2007 10:15 pm
Location: Airlie Beach....Whitsunday Region, Tropical Queensland

Re: Grass trees

Postby Tini » Wed Mar 25, 2009 8:27 pm

Phil Hansen wrote:Burning is known to promote flowering in Xanthorea spp. After the Anakie fires a couple of years ago (near Geelong), all the Xanthorea in the Steigletz National Park sent up flower shoots within a couple of months, thousands of them, really an amazing sight. Not that I would recommend doing that in a domestic garden!!! :?


I saw that, it was absolutely magnificent. :D
User avatar
Tini
Curator
 
Posts: 340
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 6:53 am
Location: Lara, Vic

Re: Grass trees

Postby Systema_Naturae » Thu Apr 09, 2009 1:22 pm

The Xanthorrhoea spp. do flower after fire, but it isn't the heat of the fire that induces flowering, it's the removal of the leaf blades that does it. You can induce flowering by cutting off the leaves with seccies too - much easier (and safer) in a suburban context than getting out the flame thrower! If you do burn them make sure it's a quick burn as a slow burning fire might actually kill the plant.

Here's a pic in the Otway National Park taken about six months ago. 12 months before the photo was taken a fire went through the area and all the X. sent up flowers. This is just a small vignette of hundreds of them throughout the area. Quite striking.

Image
Systema_Naturae
Curator
 
Posts: 384
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 10:11 pm
Location: Melbourne, Northern Suburbs

Re: Grass trees

Postby Grasshopper » Thu Apr 09, 2009 1:27 pm

but it isn't the heat of the fire that induces flowering, it's the removal of the leaf blades that does it. You can induce flowering by cutting off the leaves with seccies too -

--

I wonder if this works with the Gymea Lillies as well ?
Grasshopper
Head Curator
 
Posts: 775
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 3:55 pm
Location: Port Stephens

Re: Grass trees

Postby Systema_Naturae » Thu Apr 09, 2009 1:31 pm

Grasshopper wrote:but it isn't the heat of the fire that induces flowering, it's the removal of the leaf blades that does it. You can induce flowering by cutting off the leaves with seccies too -

--

I wonder if this works with the Gymea Lillies as well ?


I've never tried this method with Gymea Lilies, I'v had reliable success with the stone method so I've never had to explore other possibilities. From my school days, I think I remember reading that Gymea Lilies need fire to induce the production of the hormone that prompts it to flower. I know the stone method also helps the plant to produce the hormone, so I'm not entirely sure of the efficacy of lopping its leaves off :-?
Systema_Naturae
Curator
 
Posts: 384
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 10:11 pm
Location: Melbourne, Northern Suburbs

Re: Grass trees

Postby abwal » Thu Apr 09, 2009 7:59 pm

A street planting of gymeas here is very successful without any treatment. They have not been planted all that long and flowered last year. They are again in bud. Possibly treatment is necessary only in some areas?

That is a great photo of grass trees.
Gardening is sharing.
User avatar
abwal
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 8458
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2006 8:17 pm
Location: Bundaberg Qld (Sub-tropical)

Re: Grass trees

Postby Grasshopper » Fri Apr 10, 2009 4:23 am

I have a lot of the Gymea lillies here--one has flowered---(it is the HUGE one) and this time it has 3 spikes--one other--
--(has been in for about 19 years)-- this year has it's 1st spike the others have been in for 19 years and have never flowered---although the ones in the wild here --and there are many--seem to flower at least twice a year---?

With the stone method--how long did it take after you put the stone in for yours to flower ?--as the one with the 1 spike had a stone put in it about 2 to 3 years ago--and has just got it's 1st spike. I wonder why/how the stone method is said to work ?
Grasshopper
Head Curator
 
Posts: 775
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 3:55 pm
Location: Port Stephens

Doryanthes excelsa

Postby Wollemi » Thu May 08, 2014 10:02 am

With reference to the Gymea Lily, for I am about to transplant one from the shady back yard to the sunny (hot) front yard.

What's with this talk of the 'stone method' to make a Gymea Lily to flower? How big does the rock need to be? If the Doryanthes excelsa has never flowered, will the method work?
Wollemi
Weeder
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 8:20 am
Location: lwr Blue Mts

Re: Doryanthes excelsa

Postby ymfoster » Mon May 12, 2014 9:26 am

Wollemi wrote:With reference to the Gymea Lily, for I am about to transplant one from the shady back yard to the sunny (hot) front yard.

What's with this talk of the 'stone method' to make a Gymea Lily to flower? How big does the rock need to be? If the Doryanthes excelsa has never flowered, will the method work?



I googled this .....

A tip you can try at home is the stone technique. Just wedge a stone into the central part of the plant, but be careful not to damage the growing point. It actually stimulates the plant to flower by producing a naturally occurring plant hormone called ethylene, and that's been known to be responsible for flowering in bromeliads, pineapples, and it also works with Gymea lilies.


Yvonne
User avatar
ymfoster
Curator
 
Posts: 234
Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 10:29 pm
Location: Melbourne, Vic.

Re: Grass trees

Postby cobba » Mon May 26, 2014 8:29 am

Mines been in the garden for nearly 10 years now, and doing well.

In that time, many flower spikes have been produced.

Come to think of it, i have kind of neglected it in that time with no maintenance given until last week, where i have it a good haircut, then burnt it off with a blow torch.

I was pleasantly surprised to find another growing head (now three) once it was all trimmed back.

I will be interested to see if the latest work promotes it to flower.


Shayne
cobba
Apprentice
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 7:03 am
Location: Western Sydney, Australia.


Return to Australian Natives

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron