Port Jackson Fig in the ground - residential block.

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Port Jackson Fig in the ground - residential block.

Postby Wollemi » Wed Nov 20, 2013 11:31 pm

I already have two Port Jackson figs planted in the nature strip - at 2 and 1.3m height. These are 700mm back from the concrete kerbing. I am soon to remove a probable non-native 3m tree (two opposite light-green tear-drops appear in near clusters along the branchlets, along with new leaves - anyone care to ID?)
In it's place I wish to plant another Port Jackson Fig, currently of 0.5m height in a pot. This tree, when planted, will be 5m or less from the front of the house.

Can I, every 2 years, say - trench out on the property side of the gutter to chop through PJF roots to a depth of 4oo mm before they buckle the road, similarly with the fig yet to go in the middle of the front yard, nearer to the house?

Can I take evasive action prior to the fact, and bury a physical barrier? An old table say, placed vertically, 0.6m+ out from the young tree to be planted?
Wollemi
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Re: Port Jackson Fig in the ground - residential block.

Postby Wollemi » Tue Nov 26, 2013 11:15 am

Here may be something - from a dead link. Although N.American derived, I feel that all is good; to vertically slice through a PJF as it grows will not harm the tree. Also evidenced by the same tree receiving such attention across Sydney when in nature strips with concrete kerbing - Port Hacking to Gladesville to Brooklyn are some localities that come to mind.

How much of the tree roots can be disturbed before the tree will decline?
Tree roots can normally grow to that of two and one-half times the height of the tree. The area under the canopy of the tree is commonly referred to as the critical root zone. The amount of critical root zone lost is directly related to the amount of die-back in the crown of the tree. In an oak tree, if more than 30 percent of the critical root zone is lost, the tree will die. However, soft wood trees, such as box elder, can tolerate far more root disturbance.


http://www.querycat.com/question/246c30 ... d4c91df9e3 - City of Apple Valley . Natural Resources
Wollemi
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