Help!: Shade producing native for confined space btwn houses

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Help!: Shade producing native for confined space btwn houses

Postby Schuey » Sat Feb 15, 2014 5:57 pm

Hi All,

Summary:
A friend has asked me to find a suitable Native Shrub/Tree to shade a thin section of land (2.5m width) that runs along the side of his house. The late afternoon sun shines from the far end of the picture towards the camera. Thus the shade producing tree/shrub will need to sit at the far end of the garden bed relative to the camera.

photo.JPG


Location: Harrisdale (6112) South East of Perth. (Armadale Shire Council)
Soil Type: Sand
Site: The site situated between two houses, no more than 2.5m width ways, (see Pic). The site gets blasted by the brutal Perth afternoon sun but is shaded in the early morning. Is sheltered from wind.
The afternoon sun is so intense that External to the house and even internally down that side of the house (there are large glass windows) are rendered un-usable. The area needs to be shaded. So by placing a shade producing tree at the far end of the garden bed (Pictured) I should be able to shade most of that side of the house from the late afternoon sun that is particularly intense. The tree/Shrub will need to be pruned so as to be free of foliage up to the top of the fence line at which point the shade producing canopy will be allowed to spread.
I will be planting 'pencil perfect' Albany Woolly Bushes along the remainder of the fence line to screen the ugly fence and create a soothing 'green wall'.

Other specifications:
- Roof/guttering will likely be leaned on by the shrub/tree so it cannot be too heavy set or large.
- The tree will likely cover both adjoining roofs so deciduous trees are not suitable.
- The tree should reach around 4-5m in height max
- The site is very dry and the soil is sandy.
- Reticulated watering is available on site which will run two days a week over summer:

Potential Solutions????:
- Agonis Flexuosa: I was thinking of trying to squeeze in an Agonis Flexuosa 'After Dark' in the area and pruning lower branchs off until it got over the fence line.
- Hakea Multilineata
- ????
Does anyone have any comments on the suitability of the two species above, or can you suggest a native that would meet my requirement?.

Thanks for taking the time to read.

Tim
Schuey
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Re: Help!: Shade producing native for confined space btwn ho

Postby HortMaster » Mon Feb 17, 2014 12:08 pm

I would think agonis would be quite suited but I'm not really a fan of the "after dark" variety. Native hibiscus would do well also.
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Re: Help!: Shade producing native for confined space btwn ho

Postby Schuey » Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:38 pm

HortMaster wrote:I would think agonis would be quite suited but I'm not really a fan of the "after dark" variety. Native hibiscus would do well also.


Thanks for the reply Hortmaster.

There are two types of Native Hibiscus I think:

1.) alyogyne hakeifolia e.g. elle maree

2.) Alyogyne Huegelii aka Lilac hibiscus

Which one did you have in mind?
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Re: Help!: Shade producing native for confined space btwn ho

Postby HortMaster » Tue Feb 18, 2014 11:33 am

probably Hibiscus tiliaceus is my favourite:)
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Re: Help!: Shade producing native for confined space btwn ho

Postby Pam » Wed Feb 19, 2014 6:01 am

Schuey have you talked to your neighbour about your plans? My concern is that even if they are happy to have your tree overhanging their roof, any other future inhabitants may not be.

Further concerns I have about putting a tree in such a small space are firstly, from the tree's perspective, that there is not an awful lot of surface area there for a tree's roots to take up moisture, so combined with the heat that you get in there, I think it's going to struggle to get established. That aside, you're going to have to be extremely careful with your selection in making sure the tree's roots are not going to undermine your concrete foundations and cause damage to the building.
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