Coir peat bricks

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Coir peat bricks

Postby Modesty » Mon Dec 22, 2008 8:05 am

Hi
has anyone used the coir peat compresed bricks made by Brunnings? I have just spread one out around a fuschia, and a week later it looks very well, and it retains water extremely well, even though I spread it as a surface mulch rather than digging in. It seems to be a good snail/slug deterrant as well.

Has anyone else used it? I might put some in under some new plants. It is quite cheap at $2 a block at Ritchies/IGA.

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Re: Coir peat bricks

Postby littlegarden » Mon Dec 22, 2008 8:28 am

I've used them for a few things but I feel mixed about them. I tried using them as a top layer on potted plants and if anything I felt like it made the soil more hydrophobic. At the moment I just use it to thin out potting soil a bit because it's cheap.

Make sure to check the pH, I find they're incredibly acidic.
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Re: Coir peat bricks

Postby Cosmic » Mon Dec 22, 2008 3:25 pm

I used it to establish my blueberry patch and it worked well, repressed the weeds and eventually broke down. I only used a thin mulch of it though as I was concerned that it might make the soil hygrophobic but it didn't seem to. Like Littlegarden I also use it to extend potting mix which I make myself.
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Re: Coir peat bricks

Postby Longy » Mon Dec 22, 2008 6:06 pm

There are a coupe of different types of coir bricks.
The really fine ones, which i think you're referring to, are great mixed 50/50 with sand and then adding perlite as a seed raising mix. However, as a mulch, they're too fine and once dry can actually prevent moisture penetration. Far better mixed into the soil prior to planting.
There are bigger bricks which are much coarser which are a much better mulch. They cost a bit more but go a lot further too. Particularlt useful as a potted plant mulch.
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Re: Coir peat bricks

Postby Coustralee » Tue Dec 23, 2008 1:20 am

I haven't used them as a mulch, but I swear by them in pots and dug in to improve soil and hold in moisture.
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Re: Coir peat bricks

Postby littlegarden » Tue Dec 23, 2008 10:06 am

Good point - I've only used the fine stuff in the small blocks, because they were given to me as a gift. I used it as top-dressing in one pot and it was hydrophobic, so definitely don't use that kind as mulch.
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Re: Coir peat bricks

Postby Modesty » Sat Dec 27, 2008 8:47 pm

thanks for the advice- I went and dug it into the soil and covered it with mulch in one area, and the fuschia looks very happy at the moment, even after a couple of hot windy days.

The rest I used in an area where I put in some new plants, in the holes with some wettasoil granules, and this also looks pretty good. Be interesting to see how these areas go over summer.

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Re: Coir peat bricks

Postby jack » Thu Jan 13, 2011 12:58 pm

i now live in a total clay area, so have cut back on my use of them to only raised beds, but 4 years ago i was in the sandy coastal plain of perth, then i used coir bricks heaps. my trick was to get a bucket, drop peat brick in, boil kettle and pour boiling water over it, let it soak in and put in a cap or two of seasol into the mix, then add more water till it expands to capacity.
boiling water breaks the chemical compound that holds it together more rapidly than cold water.
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Re: Coir peat bricks

Postby DrDuncs » Fri Jan 14, 2011 10:07 am

Yes have used the Brunnings ones a few times. Got some for $1 or $2 at K-mart once, assumed they were incorrectly price but who am I to complain.

I used them to mix with potting mix when planting veggies in pots until I had time to put them in the garden. Found them quite good in retaining moisture, but like most things in the garden if they go really dry they become hydrophobic. I think they helped retain the moisture in the potting longer and made them easier to rehydrate though.
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Re: Coir peat bricks

Postby karyn » Fri Jan 14, 2011 2:36 pm

I do as Longy said, I wet the whole brick, add some potting mix and vermiculite and do my native cuttings directly into forestry tubes.It's acidic enough to suit the gtrevilleas, and the correas don't seem to mind very much either!
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Re: Coir peat bricks

Postby Andrew0777 » Thu Sep 26, 2013 6:46 pm

Coco peat is an organic soil derived from coconut husks which is mostly mixed with garden soil to improve its fertility. It is the best product to use in the garden soil for healthy plants and vegetable. For more details CLICK Here.
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