Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

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Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Davekyn » Sun May 08, 2011 8:08 pm

Time for me to start a new research project:
Picking up an old corrugated Iron Tank…If it’s completely shot I might use it as a compost Bin or garden bed of some description. In the mean time I am looking for ideas on how to repair old tanks such as these…given I am picking up for free, it may very well be worth fixing.
So Far I am considering a tank liner…yet to hear back on price for a 1.6mX1.9m Tank.

Here is another idea I come across elsewhere:
______________Repairs_____________________________________________
“ The tank sounds pretty bad to me so forget about screwing a patch. You'll have to drain the water out below the hole. Wet the iron around the hole and place a piece of canvas over it. Sift some cement to get the lumps out of it. Get one of those bottles you use with plants, the type that can mist water when you squeeze. Mist water on the patch and surrounding iron. Flick cements with your fingers over that area. Apply more water and cement till you have a good covering over the patch. When dry, this will hold the water. Any other places on the tank can be treated the same way but without the canvas.
If the bottom of the tank is really bad, consider emptying it totally and painting the inside with a slurry of cement and bondcrete only. Make a consistency that allows you to use a paint brush. Do not scrub the inside with a wire brush first. You'll create a thousand holes if you do. Hope this helps because it works. My grandfather was a tank maker for fifty years.”

__________________________________________________________________

Still looking for idea's...
Possibly a
water garden...but I would prefer primarily water storage
Compost
Garden Bed

Will consider more after I pick it up.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Coustralee » Sun May 08, 2011 11:00 pm

If there are only small holes in it you might be able to repair it with a product called Knead-It by selleys. Its a 2 part thing that you knead together and put on like putty, I've had mixed success with it, theres a type called Aqua which is for drinking water.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Lou » Mon May 09, 2011 11:19 am

Years ago we had a couple fiberglassed inside , one was a very high header tank that was going to be hard to replace. Luckily the guy didn't mind getting up there to do the job.
God made rainy days so gardeners could get the housework done. ~Author Unknown
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Davekyn » Mon May 09, 2011 2:01 pm

Thanks guys, please keep the tips coming...Just picked it up and looks as if there there are only three holes in the bottom, one about 3mm and the other maybe closer to 5mm. Will do a closer inspection tomorrow after attempting to give a general soft clean. One guy I priced for a Tank Liner was like $600:00!!!!!!!!...defeats the purpose. Will try some of your tips, otherwise I'll have some useful containers. All the same...I think it was a good save on my part, and offer on theirs.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Pam » Mon May 09, 2011 2:27 pm

Davekyn wrote:If the bottom of the tank is really bad, consider emptying it totally and painting the inside with a slurry of cement and bondcrete only. Make a consistency that allows you to use a paint brush. Do not scrub the inside with a wire brush first. You'll create a thousand holes if you do. Hope this helps because it works. My grandfather was a tank maker for fifty years.”[/color]
__________________________________________________________________

.


Bondcrete is not made for, nor recommended by the manufacturer for constant immersion in water. There's no reason you can't cement the bottom of the tank to seal it, but Bondcrete in that situation is not necessarily going to improve the result. There are products around that are specifically designed for immersion in water. You'd just need to be sure it was foodsafe if you were planning to drink the water.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Davekyn » Tue May 10, 2011 8:02 am

Thanks again...Major point on the consumption factor, I appreciate you pulling that one out of the hat Pam. Still giving a lot of consideration to the problem at hand. I've been inside the tank now and given my first going over with a pressure hose. NOTE*Don't use a too higher pressure, as it will be like using a wire brush and result in larger than wanted holes...BUT...I think finding a medium that reveals holes under low pressure is better than leaving would be layers of crap - given that I don't want to be constantly patching up weak holes that eventually give way...or...I think I will get a better job done removing what SLUDGE and Nasty particles I can, at the expense of of few more holes...I guess it's a fine line I'll have to note on both sides with relation to removing the crap and leaving some tank left :lol:

The result of my cleaning so far...about 30ish very small ones around the walls of the tank...1mm to 2.5mm with most about 1.5mm......and the bottom with quite a few around the sides where it meets the wall and possibly 20 spread out and one large patch of holes concentrated in one area. Some of these holes are up to a 5mm triangle however most around 2mm-3mm.

There was a heap of sludge and crap that I had to keep unblocking to let the water out...made for a very arduous task of cleaning which I am yet to finish today...then hopefully let it dry. You won't believe, but it's now raining at the most inconvenient time...Story of my life :roll:

Other considerations...Transport weight I generally have to do things myself...not many reliable people these days and I generally get more done on my own with just the odd hard to find genuine mate on occasion...those that turn up willingly :wink: SO a concrete bottom, although indeed feasible...is something I'll leave out until I land on a piece of land I can call my own or someone blesses me with say 4 years running resadance. (something else that seems to be the go theses days...(move em in...move em out-maintenance and revenue related)...sorry...back to the tank...

Consumption...whilst I don't think we will be drinking from it any time soon :lol: The wife and I can be rather radical at times with regards to the softest of chemicals. I am very stringent on the way I grow food as well as eat it...Hhhmmmmmmm...well...more so grow it to be honest...I like to that my bad eating habits are more the phase than the radical healthy eating way I get ways. SO...........

I'm just not quite sure about the Black Bitumen Paint my good willing neighbor passed me yesterday as I was cleaning my tank. At any rate I've only seen the term straight corrugated iron used with that on the internet let alone wonder about what particles are released into the water as the sun beats down on the side of the tank. I do think that the bitumen paint would hold up better under pressure, but will most likely consider chemical output as priority in the end. Some of the already mentioned may very well be safer in that regards for my plants. I think bitumen should not be that bad..but really don't know...I know I am picky and long winded, but that's how I process information and mostly have fun doing it...most of the time.

At any rate ... this is as far as I have come with that little project......good clean out first......then find the appropriate sealant......with regard to application of sealant...I'm wondering about the use of Patches to assist with pressure, as to what size hole requires a patch and what does not + the application on both the inside and outer...I can't help but think this will determined by the type of sealant used! ??? ... Still got some cleaning to do so will worry about it latter.

Better to be long about it and have a good finish that is going to last. Thanks for your patients and I'll keep you informed as to weather this hole post whole thread holds water or not.

Cheers
Dave :wink:
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Pam » Tue May 10, 2011 9:17 am

You'd do well to consider patching from the inside rather than on the outside where feasible Dave. I've seen the odd patching job done on the outside of a tank spring a leak some months after it has seemingly been fixed. Patched on the inside, the water pressure will hold it in place, rather than pushing against it if on the outside.

As for finding holes, you could always climb inside with a good strong torch when it's getting dark ..... you'd need someone on the outside marking the spots where the light comes through, of course.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby taffyman » Tue May 10, 2011 7:23 pm

if you are definitely not going to drink the water, then I'd say the Bitumen Paint is probably your best option. If there is a lot of rust in the tank, I'd also suggest using a rust converter before the paint. If you can source it, there's one called Ranex rust converter or rust buster. I've used it myself and it's excellent. If you don't, then it won't be long before the rust lifts the Bitumen paint off.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Davekyn » Tue May 10, 2011 9:25 pm

Hi Taffy...Thanks! Not sure about the bitumen paint at this stage. Need to look further into the effects on soil and plants as well. If there is another option that simply requires more time, but is less toxic...then I will go that route. I've been busy cleaning as best in my allotted time over the last two days and also recording those efforts in here for others. So far so good...the tank is said to be about 20 years old and if that's the case, then it has fared well. I do believe I will look into the rust treatment as you say. I have put up two pictures for you and others to comment on, as well as a video of the inside of the tank after my efforts to clean it thus far. There is another video of how I cleaned the tank, but it's more for a silly garden video diary I am throwing together.

The tank is still wet and needs to be dried. Once dried I intend to brush any left over debris and am contemplating a very light sand??? Followed most likely by some kind of rust treatment. Still looking for some adhesive that is non toxic and possible patches for the larger holes. I will go down and talk to Clark rubber about some of their waterproofing options. My brother in law in also a plumber and I will ask his opinion too.

I still have a ways to go with the brushing and very light sanding/rubbing (maybe)...I don't mind taking my time so will be sure to go down the right path. In the mean time...please give me feed back. Perhaps I have gone the wrong way about cleaning...but does not seem so bad at this stage. I;ll most likely take the tarps off during the day to help with the drying, but we have wet weather here at the moment.

Thanks again all (Y)

Video - First the video of me being a goose and doing the the clean Job :wink:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yx7LlNqGQfg

Video - Inside the Tank after the Clean, but still wet and in need of further treatment before application of appropriate adhesive/filler/patches & Paint
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4lyjuvDea4

PICTURES after I washed the inside of tank thoroughly!
ImageImage
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Davekyn » Wed May 11, 2011 7:48 am

Have since realized I would do better to sit the tank on some logs or beams of wood rather than on the tarp as I did so. Contacting plumber today to see what his thoughts are.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Geoff Clifton » Wed May 11, 2011 6:11 pm

Hi Dave.

Go FIBREGLASS.

It's got nothing to do with glass. Polyester resin dosed with a few drops of catalyst and painted onto chopped fibre matting over the holes. Sticks like STAB and stronger than both of us. Get it at boat repairers or the proper wholesalers. It's a silly price in hardware shops.

Cheers, Geoff.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Davekyn » Wed May 11, 2011 6:38 pm

Thanks Geoff...I'll look into that for sure...My brother said something very similar (Y) will keep yas posted...
Might be picking up some throw away house stumps tomorrow...thanks to free cycle.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Pam » Fri May 13, 2011 7:43 am

Ah! Gotta love freecycle.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Davekyn » Fri May 13, 2011 4:52 pm

Yep...Just scored some house stumps. Might actually make a small tank stand out of them and pass on to the neighbor who reckons he can use them for fire wood (???????)
WELL.....I FEEL LIKE A REAL GOOSE.......I ended up taking the top off the tank...after all the crawling in and out :twisted: !!!!!!!!!
Oh well ...
SO,,,,,,I used a wire brush on the end of my right angled grinder for the walls of the Tank.....I only attacked the holes I could see after the pressure hosing and a brushing down. I just used a soft sand block all in one piece for the floor. After rubbing back I then used the recommended rust converter, and think I have accounted for 99.9999999% of the holes.

The bitumen I am using can be used inside water tanks, however needs 14 days to dry at 20 degrees....so being winter I guess about 3 weeks before I give it a good wash out. ORMONOID (when dry, will not contaminate drinking water)
Needs to be applied with stiff brush and or paint scraper (the stuff passed to me looks fairly hard...hope its not dead)....can be soften or thinned with turps.

Will give it a go tomorrow hopefully....and with a bit of luck, I might be able to even get the tank lid back on!!!!
edit....at the end of the day.....It's just going to be used on the veggie plants, and despite my over analytic, perfectionist ways....I think it will be good enough for my veggies and something I won't mind patching up down the track. I would of preferred to give the whole tank a good going over and spent more time on it, however just could not afford the extra paint to do the lot......The only outside work I am doing is on the floor to spot patch the same whole from the other side.

Thanks for you tips....hopefully it will hold water.

ANY IDEAS ON AN EASY WAY TO MAKE A STAND OR BASE???.....was thinking about a sand pit, but might put something like sleepers with board across to the tap some access point......If these house stumps are good enough, I was thinking of cutting them clean with a chainsaw and sitting them low on a sand base and building a sleeper based pallet on it??????
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby Pam » Fri May 13, 2011 5:54 pm

do you have access to a wacker packer Dave? We built a frame for our using 200mm sleepers then filed with compacted crusher dust. As you're no doubt aware, a tank full of water holds a fair bit of weight, so your base needs to be good and solid, and level.
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Re: Corragated Iron Tanks/Repairs & Uses

Postby taffyman » Fri May 13, 2011 7:11 pm

Sure does Pam. This one measuring 1.6mm x 1.9mm will weigh 3.8 tonnes plus the weight of the tank itself.
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