Ladybird larvae ...

A Forum for discussion of ideas and techniques for gardening practices that encourage biodiversity and minimise the adverse impact on the environment through such things as reduced water use, organic pest control and wildlife friendly practices.
Includes Environmental Weeds sub-forum

Moderators: Forum_mod, Pam, jack, Sam, Lea

Ladybird larvae ...

Postby Lea » Wed May 18, 2011 5:19 pm

... correct? Are they ladybird larvae?

And, is it their fault that our viburnum's leaves are becoming so mottled and damaged? I suspect this is worth it, though, for the reward of new adult ladybirds ...?

Image

Image

Image
"The butterfly does not count years, but moments, and therefore has enough time." - Rabindranath Tagore
User avatar
Lea
Head Curator
 
Posts: 866
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2004 2:50 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby Stormgirl » Wed May 18, 2011 5:31 pm

Oh no....it looks like the evil ladybird to me...what's it called again? The one that causes damage to plants? That's right...the 28 spotted ladybird. It's highly likely that they are causing damage to your viburnum, and no, you don't want to breed anymore of these ones. :twisted:
User avatar
Stormgirl
Curator
 
Posts: 376
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:29 am
Location: Sydney

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby bubba louie » Wed May 18, 2011 7:24 pm

The larvae don't look like that.

unless they are pupating?????

http://www.coolpicturegallery.net/2008/ ... dybug.html
“Just living is not enough... One must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.”
Hans Christian Andersen
User avatar
bubba louie
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 6803
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 6:23 pm
Location: Brisbane

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby Lea » Wed May 18, 2011 8:26 pm

Thanks very much, Stormgirl and Bubba Louie ...

Stormgirl, because of your comment, I googled '28 spotted ladybird' and found more info - so thanks ...

Bubba Louie - that's a great site you've provided too - some fantastic photography there - and the ninth and tenth photos on that site (http://www.coolpicturegallery.net/2008/ ... dybug.html), well, I'm thinking that maybe the 'shells' that we've photographed were the final cycle of the larvae?

However - I'm now beginning to think that *maybe* the photo we snapped of the ladybird 'lurking around' the two browned larvae - in light of the info I've just read on these four sites, is it possible she's a different species and was in fact *eating* the other two ...?

I already knew (quote from this site - http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane ... otted.html): "Most ladybird beetles are predators on soft body insects...."

But what I didn't know, regarding the 26/28 spotted ladybird: "This ladybird species, both larvae and adults, feed on plants. Usually the adults feed on the upper surface of leaves, while the larvae feeds on the lower surface." And here's some photos of the plant-eating ladybird - I don't think this is the same one as the one we photographed on our viburnum:

http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane ... otted.html

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.a ... ybird.html

http://aussieorganicgardening.com/?p=718

Which (if it's another species) still doesn't explain the current severe leaf damage all-over our tree - and there's no cure, except sprays which would kill the 'good' ladybirds and other bugs too (we never like using chemicals as you know, for the rest of the wildlife in our garden) - except to pay a lot more attention to watering and feeding this particular plant - so, we'll do that - and see if it survives (yes, it's that poorly at the moment) ...
"The butterfly does not count years, but moments, and therefore has enough time." - Rabindranath Tagore
User avatar
Lea
Head Curator
 
Posts: 866
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2004 2:50 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby MacMaples » Wed May 18, 2011 11:32 pm

Is it just the viburnum? I've got a problem with mine too (posted a query the other day). I remember finding out something about it before but the damage was minor and a bit of a prune fixed it up. Much worse this time (due to much wetter growing season maybe, I don't know?). Wish I could remember more.
MacMaples
Senior Curator
 
Posts: 666
Joined: Fri May 09, 2008 11:45 am
Location: Canberra

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby Stormgirl » Thu May 19, 2011 11:12 am

I know they don't look the same as the photos you've found, but you'll find the "evil" ones don't necessarily look like that, and I've found that they are a bit larger than the usual ladybirds....also, sit and watch them for a while to work it out. I once witnessed a leaf-eating ladybird chew its way through a leaf. I had never heard of them either, before that, and was horrified to see the thing munching through my eggplants!
User avatar
Stormgirl
Curator
 
Posts: 376
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:29 am
Location: Sydney

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby Geoff Clifton » Thu May 19, 2011 10:34 pm

Those pics are NOT a 28 spot and I wish you more success than we had googling the thousands of other possibilities. I like the idea of having enough time to just watch them :)
User avatar
Geoff Clifton
Head Gardener
 
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:19 am
Location: La Perouse, Sydney.

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby Lea » Sun May 22, 2011 7:25 pm

Thanks, MacMaples, Stormgirl, and Geoff Clifton ...

Yep, Geoff, that's why I posted those several links in my above post -- as I mentioned, our above photographed ladybird is clearly another species from those pictured at these links, which show that the so-called 'bad' 26- and 28-spotted ladybirds have much smaller black spots, as here: http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane ... otted.html
http://aussieorganicgardening.com/?p=718
And the pics at this site thanks to Bubba Louie, too: http://www.coolpicturegallery.net/2008/ ... dybug.html

And, Stormgirl, yes, that is a good idea, to simply observe -- at the time, we noticed, it really did look as if the ladybird in our above photo was indeed circling and eating the two (dead? or shells of?) larvae ...

Thus, maybe more than one species of ladybird on the one bush -- which is why we would not spray chemicals, which would of course kill the 'good' insects too ...

Yes, MacMaples, it's only our viburnum that is looking so sick -- I was reading that the insects might have attacked this one particular plant because of current weakness caused by having dried out through the drought ... I'll look for your post on your viburnum -- thanks ...
"The butterfly does not count years, but moments, and therefore has enough time." - Rabindranath Tagore
User avatar
Lea
Head Curator
 
Posts: 866
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2004 2:50 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby bubba louie » Sun May 22, 2011 9:16 pm

One that I've learnt to look out for is the Mealybug Ladybird. At first glance the larvae looks just like a mealybug but it actually eats them.

http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane ... dybird.htm
“Just living is not enough... One must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.”
Hans Christian Andersen
User avatar
bubba louie
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 6803
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 6:23 pm
Location: Brisbane

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby Getafix » Sun May 22, 2011 10:05 pm

There were a couple of photos on that link that from BL that did resemble the bugs in your photos, so i reckon it probably was some pupating lady bugs...i've never seen it before so you're pretty luck to have got a photo of it i reckon.

Could it be the ladybugs are eating whatever is causing the problem on your viburnum? If you've got aphids or scale which some lady bugs will eat then you could also be getting some sooty mould or other problems spread by the bad bugs.

Just a thought.
Check my garden out on MyFolia:

http://myfolia.com/gardener/Getafix
User avatar
Getafix
Curator
 
Posts: 443
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:48 pm
Location: Newcastle, NSW

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby Lea » Mon May 23, 2011 7:03 pm

Thanks, Bubba Louie - I checked out your newly posted link - wow, good ladybirds whose larvae look just like mealybugs - who these ladybirds eat! Very cool - and good to know that all mealybug-looking bugs are NOT mealybugs (Y) :)

And isn't adaptation and evolution impressive (#)

Getafix, maybe you're right - and thanks - maybe it's not bugs at all, but a plant virus/disease. However the freshest new growth is looking bright green and healthier - and we've decided not to spray chemicals, whether for bugs or diseases, because we don't want to harm any good bugs and wildlife in our garden (especially our resident frogs and birds). We're instead actively working on making this plant healthier, more water, maybe later some plant food - it's true that the root ball beneath the canopy is very, very dry despite our recent rains (floods!) - and so c'est la vie, we shall see ... (Y) 8)
"The butterfly does not count years, but moments, and therefore has enough time." - Rabindranath Tagore
User avatar
Lea
Head Curator
 
Posts: 866
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2004 2:50 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby bubba louie » Mon May 23, 2011 10:02 pm

Lea wrote:Thanks, Bubba Louie - I checked out your newly posted link - wow, good ladybirds whose larvae look just like mealybugs - who these ladybirds eat! Very cool - and good to know that all mealybug-looking bugs are NOT mealybugs (Y) :)



You can tell them apart if you look closely. The ladybird has more defined spikes and moves about.
“Just living is not enough... One must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.”
Hans Christian Andersen
User avatar
bubba louie
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 6803
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 6:23 pm
Location: Brisbane

Re: Ladybird larvae ...

Postby Lea » Tue May 24, 2011 10:24 pm

bubba louie wrote:
Lea wrote:Thanks, Bubba Louie - I checked out your newly posted link - wow, good ladybirds whose larvae look just like mealybugs - who these ladybirds eat! Very cool - and good to know that all mealybug-looking bugs are NOT mealybugs (Y) :)

You can tell them apart if you look closely. The ladybird has more defined spikes and moves about.

(Y) 8)
"The butterfly does not count years, but moments, and therefore has enough time." - Rabindranath Tagore
User avatar
Lea
Head Curator
 
Posts: 866
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2004 2:50 pm
Location: Melbourne


Return to Sustainable Gardening

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests