Tomato Wilt

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Tomato Wilt

Postby karyn » Fri Dec 28, 2012 7:14 pm

I've lost 2 tomatoes very suddenly - over the course of 2 days - to what looks like a form of wilt. Now another 3 are looking wilty. I think I'd be best pulling them up tomorrow if they don't perk up overnight. From the little bit of reading I've done, it looks like there's no cure, and I just need to suck it up. Has anyone got any suggestions? They are mulched, well watered once or twice a week, fed well before it got too hot with sheep poop, dynamic lifter and sulphate of potash. I try not to water the leaves, and they're all planted in shallow dips, which I fill with water and let drain. They're in full sun, not under any shadecloth and we've had hot, then cold, then hot, then cold weather. I can't remember the varieties, but I'm pretty sure 2 of the sick ones are 'mighty red', which is supposed to be a more disease resistant cultivar.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby jaden62 » Sat Dec 29, 2012 8:20 am

I can't answer you, but I'm in the Northern Suburbs of Adelaide, & I've got a couple of tomato plants I'm keeping an eye on too. For some reason, this year my tomatoes haven't taken off like they have over the last couple of years & I'm not sure if I should be concerned about it or not. Like yours they have been well fed & watered (particularly before the hot days), but mine are under light shadecloth at the moment (waiting for the next lot of heat/harsh sun), but nothing different to other years. I've got 4 different plants - all various heritage tomatoes (lost their labels though) & none of them are doing as well as normal.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby Stormgirl » Sun Dec 30, 2012 10:43 am

Did you pull them up yet?

I find tomatoes are very prone to wilt here in Sydney. Unless I can find a new spot to grow them every year, I don't bother unless they are wilt resistant tomatoes (which aren't much fun)

If it is wilt, then there's no point in ensuring good drainage, sun, fertilising etc because it's doomed no matter what you do. And the soil will be tainted for years to come. So find a new area in the garden or try growing in large pots.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby greg.l » Sun Dec 30, 2012 1:36 pm

Yates anti-rot phosacid might be worth trying, it is a systemic that controls root rot. It won't save infected plants but may help protect your other plants. You can even inject it into the stem. it isn't specified for tomatoes but might help.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby karyn » Sun Dec 30, 2012 9:12 pm

I watered them well, they looked marginally better in the morning and were wilted again after a bit of sun. I binned them. The poo of it is some of them were 'mighty red", which is supposed to be resistant :(

I've put in a few more in different spots, and will have a couple of tomato free years in the garden after this season. I do have a few large pots, and I can put lots in at my Sister's house as well. It's just a pain because it's good soil, good mulch, well composted etc.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby Pam » Mon Dec 31, 2012 5:44 am

Earlier this year we put 4 plants in an area of about 1.2 metres square, in a raised bed with imported mix (our heavy clay soil is not suitable for filling a raised vegie bed.) Strangely, within a week or so just one of those plants showed sign of wilt. We pulled it out, and none of the others had any problem. I'm guessing it must have been developing in the plant before we bought it?
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby Geoff Clifton » Mon Dec 31, 2012 9:34 am

We had the same problem in September with 4 plants that had grown very strongly over winter. We pulled three out but as an experiment left one. We removed all the leaves, pruned and started a program of tomatoe dust and a weekly spray with a mix of 2 tsp bicarb, 1 tsp olive oil & a few drops of dw liquid in 750ml water. Add the famous B&B and the plant is now cropping very well.

That same spray has been used on our zuchs alternated with a similar spray containing milk and for the first time ever our zuch plants are fabulously healthy with an upright bush instead of laying on the ground smothered with powdery mildew.

HNY, Geoff.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby abrogard » Fri Jan 11, 2013 5:12 am

Very interesting. I have the same problem with my Grosse Lisse. I will try the spray. What is 'the famous B&B' ?

:)
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby Geoff Clifton » Fri Jan 11, 2013 7:06 am

Blood and bone
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby karyn » Fri Jan 11, 2013 2:34 pm

Grosse Lisse sucks!! It's a weak, disease ridden, poor cropping crappy tomato. Course, that's only my opinion :D I've never had any luck with it here in the Hills. The last wilting tommie is still in the ground as it's well away from the others, it's still hanging in there, the fruit's still growing. The others all look fine. It's too hot now to use any oil sprays, I think.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby Canuck » Sun Jan 13, 2013 7:59 pm

Does this look like tomato wilt? I'm new to gardening. I would really like to keep them but if they need. To be ripped out ill get on with it.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby karyn » Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:15 pm

Doesn't look like mine, could it be getting too hot next to that brick wall? It looks a little burnt. I'd keep them, there are still some good leaves on there.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby Canuck » Sat Jan 19, 2013 3:23 pm

Thanks, ill leave them in. Could I have been watering them too much? I've heard that can hurt them.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby abrogard » Sat Jan 19, 2013 7:23 pm

That's a funny thing - I posted an impassioned reply extolling the virtue of Grosse Lisse as the archetype Aussie Burger tomato and it hasn't appeared... Must have pressed the wrong button or something... ah well... can't redo it.. moment of inspiration and all....

What brand of tomato are you growing, Canuck? Because yours appear to have what mine have got.......

:)
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Re: Tomatoes etc.

Postby lilly60 » Sun Jan 20, 2013 2:42 pm

re: Tomatoes - luckily this year I have not had any probs, but have had probs with Gross Lisse in the past. This year I am growing "First Prize" . The bushes have been great, lots of healthy fruit and even withstanding the awful heat 40+ days we have had (without shelter! and full afternoon sun. I will definitely buy these again. I have also am having success with lettuces and zucch. in containers this year. May try the toms. in containers next year (they are huge old fashioned concrete containers - painted white). Also cuts down on the weeding and watering (also surface soil covered in pea straw). So far so good....
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby abrogard » Sun Jan 20, 2013 3:12 pm

Would you say it is too late for tomatoes - grown from seed? If not I'll copy you, go get some and try it.

Likewise with lettuce and zucc. I have some zucchini in and they've been there since early spring - I thought I was being smart, came badly undone - but they've crawled along. However they are showing signs of fruiting now, though they haven't reached any great height.

So lettuce and tomato - should I go for them or too late?

I begin to think location is very, very important and you're in Adelaide at least, though very different bit of country, however your temperatures are much the same as here.

:)

edit: Not zucchini since early Spring: Broccoli since early spring. The Zucchini is a recent planting, the only recent planting because my beds were full of non-performers, and it is going well. The Broccoli is showing signs of fruiting.
Last edited by abrogard on Mon Jan 21, 2013 6:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby greg.l » Sun Jan 20, 2013 6:36 pm

Too late for tomato, maybe difficult to get lettuce established in the heat, but you can plant lettuce any time of year.
I have been growing mortgage lifter tomato, the flavour is exceptional.
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby lilly60 » Sun Jan 20, 2013 7:56 pm

Yes, Abrogard, location, location (not only applies to real estate but also gardening I think :P ) I will continue with planting my veg in large containers as I am having a great deal of success with that. As I said in an earlier post, I will definitely try tommies next year in containers. I could also get cheeky and move them around in their pots to suit sun availability and perhaps avoid it when it reaches its scorching 40+ mode. With containers, I find everything is much easier to control and monitor, including fertilising. It is also especially handy with the watering, where the water you are putting on the plants is not being "lost" to a larger surrounding area and is confined to just that group. I also find slugs and snails don't like the climb up to those lovely tasty seedlings, particularly if the container has a reasonably rough surface. However the white cabbage moths still get to the lettuce leaves! I am a somewhat lazy gardener (or impatient at least) in that I buy seedlings of what I want to grow. But I don't have a huge veggie production operation and so just a a couple of different punnets of the veges that appeal to me at the time suits me ok. However, it you grow from seed, then at least you know where they are when they are in a container! :)
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby abrogard » Mon Jan 21, 2013 6:35 am

I wonder what your 'large containers' are? I use buckets that I get cheap from the supermarket.

Can't put pics inline I've used my quota but here's a link to Picasa, they display well:

https://picasaweb.google.com/abrogard/Garden?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCNfSo7fNu5GtSQ&feat=directlink

I would like to do more. The capsicum and particularly the peppers I want in containers, moveable, so's I can grow them year round as perennials, which I believe is possible.

But I find it's not quite so easy. I must use potting mix. Garden soil is no good for the job. And then water runs straight through so I must water very fequently. Then there's no nourishment so I must feed frequently. And getting water and feed judged right isn't easy for me.

And then there's root bound to consider, I suppose.... So it doesn't currently look too easy to me so I'm keen for all the information, hints and clues I can get on how to do it.

Like I've discovered, I think, that red is a bad colour for these buckets. The red plastic degrades and goes brittle where the blue doesn't. A bit like the disaster many people find with the paint job on their red cars, we had a Volvo with that problem, the paint faded and turned to powder. Must be something magic about the red wavelength - when it is not absorbed, i.e. reflected and the item looks red, the material begins to deteriorate...

:)
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Re: Tomato Wilt

Postby jaden62 » Mon Jan 21, 2013 6:41 am

I really haven't had any luck with my tomatoes this year, both in raised beds & in pots. Normally my husband laughs & says "if she spits on the ground, a tomato grows", but they've all done badly this year. I've got Mortgage Lifter, Russian Red, Wapsiconicon Peach (or whatever it is), a tiny feral tomato & 2 others that I don't remember. The tiny feral tomato did well before Xmas, I've had a few Russian Reds & a couple of W.Peaches, but nothing else. They're not even flowering. I've treated them the same as every other year, but I don't know what the problem is.

My lettuce either sits & sulks, or bolts; my chillies aren't performing as well as normal (well, except for a Habenero bush which seems to have gone mad), beans haven't produced, pumpkins are producing flowers, but 2 vines (the same) are only producing male flowers & the other vine (different) is only producing female flowers. My carrots are small & weak, watermelons keep dying & only about 3 beetroot came up. On the "up" side, I've got rhubarb plotting world domination, but there's only so much rhubarb you can eat! My strawberries are also looking healthy this year & producing "some" (better than "none", which has been my usual result with strawberries), not a lot, but enough for a regular taste.

By this time of the year I'm normally taking bags of tomatoes & chillies into work to get rid of them. But this year I can't produce enough for us.

On a side note, do capsicums get blossom end rot like tomatoes? I've got capsicums & chillies in a bed on their own, one chilli (the habenero) is going great guns, the other is producing slowly, but the capsicums keep getting brown patches on them & rotting. I thought it was sunburn, but this even happened under shadecloth.
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