Mangoes

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Mangoes

Postby abwal » Sun Dec 22, 2013 10:14 am

Some of our Kensington Pride mangoes that I managed to save from the bats.
The larger one in the foreground weighed in at 1.14kg.

Mango.jpg
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Re: Mangoes

Postby Tropicgardener » Sun Dec 22, 2013 12:51 pm

Nice haul there.........contemplating putting some in here on my new property. I had a huge Kensington Pride in Bundy but like yours I got very few intact mangoes due to the flying foxes.
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Re: Mangoes

Postby midgin » Sun Dec 22, 2013 1:42 pm

Yummo. (Y) (Y) .. did I mention, I am so very, very jealous.... :lol:
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Re: Mangoes

Postby Keo » Sun Dec 22, 2013 5:37 pm

Oh how I wish Mangoes grew down here. I love them but hardly ever have them cause they are too expensive.
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Re: Mangoes

Postby Pam » Mon Dec 23, 2013 5:21 am

Keo wrote:Oh how I wish Mangoes grew down here. I love them but hardly ever have them cause they are too expensive.


Those in the shops are generally a pale comparison to a freshly-picked ripe mango though. They are picked too green or something, because they never seem to ripen completely.
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Re: Mangoes

Postby JNarelle » Mon Dec 23, 2013 8:22 am

Kensington Pride (or Bowens) - i don't think there is any other variety that can compare to the flavour. :D wouldn't be Christmas without some Bowen mangoes (Y)
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Re: Mangoes

Postby abwal » Mon Dec 23, 2013 10:12 am

I agree that this variety has the best flavour. Certainly beats most of the hybrids on sale.
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Re: Mangoes

Postby midgin » Mon Dec 23, 2013 2:46 pm

A little tip re use of a lovely ripe mango. In a blender pour some good quality orange juice...sufficient for two or more people, add the pulp of a mango and a generous handful of common old garden mint. Blend...add ice.... perfect for Christmas breakfast or brunch. ... on my menu this year....wink...wink. :D

A sure fire winner....believe me... (Y) (Y)
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Re: Mangoes

Postby heli » Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:48 pm

This is a large tree with extensive root system, is it? It's not from the drawf variety?

I'm looking for some fruit tree for my garden which does not have that huge a space for a big tree.
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Re: Mangoes

Postby abwal » Sat Feb 01, 2014 6:47 pm

Kensington Pride can be pruned to keep it small. Most commercial growers do this for ease of picking.

Dwarf mangoes are available from some nurseries. A Google search may find them.
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Re: Mangoes

Postby bubba louie » Sat Feb 01, 2014 11:48 pm

I've been buying them by the tray. Our green grocer reduces the price significantly when they are about to become over ripe. We have no trouble scoffing them down before they turn. :D

I made a big fruit salad for a party and sliced the cheeks and then squeezed juice and pulp off the seeds over the whole thing. It was a bit of a hit, if I do say so myself.
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Re: Mangoes

Postby gardenlen » Sun Feb 02, 2014 5:35 am

when you prune open up the middle which will bring the height down, this allows more light into the tree and more fruit to develop.

nice looking mangos, our tree is a long way from fruiting only in the ground 18 months

apparently now the stupid markets don't want any fruit ripening on the shelf, this adds to their shrinkage problems, so all are treated, to supposedly ripen at home, same with stone fruits, they just go wrinkly and never ripen.

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Re: Mangoes

Postby hoddo » Sun Feb 02, 2014 6:52 am

How hard can I prune our Bowen, we let it go as we thought we wanted a big tree and its about 5m tall now and a bit legy. Can I cut a few meters off to thicken it up and make it easier for picking?
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Re: Mangoes

Postby gardenlen » Mon Feb 03, 2014 10:23 am

they'll take a hard cut, one bloke his tree looked like a skeleton, cut the middle out first.

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Re: Mangoes

Postby hoddo » Sat Mar 08, 2014 2:51 pm

Abwal That's a great mango at 1.14k. I've been picking ours for a week or 2 now and I thought they looked massive but the bigger ones only weighed in at 700-800 grams which I imagine thats the size of those smaller ones in your photo? You mention you saved them from the fruit bats, I am losing a few to bats now, some drop to the ground with just a few small bites out of them, is it safe to cut the damaged bits off and wash and eat the rest?
Gardenlen, thanks for your reply regarding mango pruneing, the guy who cut his tree back to a skeleton, how long did it take to recover and bear good fruit?
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Re: Mangoes

Postby abwal » Mon Mar 24, 2014 9:29 pm

Hoddo, I take no risks where bats are concerned. All damaged fruit goes into the compost bin.
We had quite a good crop this year as did most of the growers in the area so there was a large amount of fruit around. We probably managed to get about 10% of our crop. I have tried just about every known method to beat the bats, but none works well. Very heavy netting is probably the most successful. The usual bird netting is useless as they simply tear it to pieces.
I now just try to beat them to the fruit by timing when to pick. When there is plenty of fruit around, they tend to target fruit that has a smell. If you pick fruit that is mature, but not yet starting to ripen, it will usually ripen very successfully with full flavour.
I pick the fruit with most of the long stem attached as this avoids damage to the skin caused by sap leaking from the cut stem.
Ten percent sounds bad, but, compared with zero percent for our lychees it is a vast improvement.
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Re: Mangoes

Postby hoddo » Tue Mar 25, 2014 6:47 am

I actually think most of my damage is from possums, little bugggers, the bags stop them for a while but when the fruit is really ripe they eat thru them. That's a good tip about leaving the stem, thanks, not sure when I'll get to use it as mango crops a few and far between down here in Sydney. Here's hoping for a dry flowering/fruit set season again next year.
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