Designing garden for extreme heat

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Designing garden for extreme heat

Postby Scullybcdali » Sat Aug 29, 2015 9:22 pm

Hiya all! I'm new around here and relatively new to gardening, so please be gentle!
I started a veggie patch last year with the mindset of 'if it lives, it lives. If it dies it dies *shrug*' and with little more than a handful of big W seedlings, a few buckets of sheep turd, and a soaker hose that I would often forget to turn on/off, I by some miracle managed to turn off an alright (if very simple) crop of tomatoes, Zucchini, silverbeet, cucumber, pumpkin, a couple cabbage etc. The point is I put in a very half-arsed attempt last year and was thinking of upping the game a little this year.

Now we all know the 6 p's? Prior preparation prevents piss poor performance. So I figured it was time to start some prep work, only problem is, I don't know much about gardening... At all. I live on a sheep station out in far north western NSW and during summer we can get the pleasure (not) of a week straight to 45+ degree days. (And negative degree nights and frosts in winter... Yay) Everything I've been reading these days has been all about raised garden beds, but in my mind, that is simply more surface area for absorbing heat and it will just cook my roots. Am I right?

What is the way to go, for planting a crop that will survive the heat? I know plant selection, having good organic matter in the soils, mulching and possibly a shade cloth for those hell weeks, are all essential but I mean more in terms of layout. Ie. If raised beds are no good, then what do people suggest? Just planting on flat ground? Build little mounds/furrows and plant on top?

Any help will be greatly appreciated. I'm super motivated right now and have just started weeding (and by weeding, I mean attacking ajungle so thick that it was stalling my ride on mower) and mixing in some organic matter and manure into a few of my plots, and would like to get something set up ASAP, before I loose my mojo!
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Re: Designing garden for extreme heat

Postby gardenlen » Sun Aug 30, 2015 5:27 am

the surface area of a garden is the same raised or ground level, for me ground level can get more of a baking, as with raised beds well mulched not seemingly so

in summer a good layout is beds running north south and to the eastern aspect with shade from around 10am, or build a hoop shade house over the gardens,

take care
With peace and brightest of blessings,

len

--
"Be Content With What You Have And
May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
A World That You May Not Understand."

http://www.lensgarden.com.au
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Re: Designing garden for extreme heat

Postby greg.l » Sun Aug 30, 2015 6:08 am

Wind protection is really important. I find drip tube with a timer is the best watering system to get water right in to the roots regularly. try and time your veggies for spring and autumn.
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Re: Designing garden for extreme heat

Postby dalelesley » Wed Sep 02, 2015 3:56 pm

100_2781.JPG
Welcome scaullybcdali, as you live on a station you will no doubt have plenty of sheep and maybe cattle manure laying around. slightly raised beds even is better than ground level as the soil will stay damp a tad longer than flat on the ground. I think if you live in 40+ summers as I did before coming to Tasmania then some shade cloth would be good but do not get any that gives toooo much shade. I always watered my vegies at night, some say what did you say but to me it makes sense as the evening are cooler and there for the plants get a better drink and do not get burnt. I have now some old water tanks that we cut in half and made two beds out of them also have treated pine box beds (be careful as some treated pine is toxic to vegies) As for frost well we get -4 regular here and my cabbage, silver beet, caulie flower, raddish, red onions, garlic, cos lettuce and iceberg lettuce all survived as well as my swedes, turnips, and parsnips. In fact we are eating the root vegies now as well as the lettuce and silver beet. Your tomatoes should be ok with the warmer weather infact they hate the frost. Most of what you have listed should all be ok if you keep some sort of shade but not heavy shade over them Peas both snap and podded peas beans and broad beans would also be ok if you have some where for them to climb or buy the dwarf variety you can also buy seeds online of just about every vegie you can think of. If you would like the addy of a seed selling company I can give that to you as well. Water melon and rock melon will be ok in the warmer weather. Don't know if you have access to old hay if so it make great mulch if you first cover it with plastic to kill off the seeds and weeds. Also my mother used wool at times any daggy wool will do but do not smother the plant with it as they need air and wool holds the moister well. I think you know what I mean. Any way hope this will be of help will enclose a pic of our vegie patch it might give you some sort of idea of what you can do yourself.
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Re: Designing garden for extreme heat

Postby gardenlen » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:46 am

i missed the station bit but not only manure, dead animals as well, saw a doco' where the lady created her beds like hugelkultur, any dead cattle she had place where she wanted a garden and then piled dirt on top, way to go. waste no resource, if it rots use it
With peace and brightest of blessings,

len

--
"Be Content With What You Have And
May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
A World That You May Not Understand."

http://www.lensgarden.com.au
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Re: Designing garden for extreme heat

Postby Scullybcdali » Wed Dec 02, 2015 6:12 pm

I know you all replied months ago but I just wanted to say thankyou for the advice! I never got an email telling me I had replies so thaught no-one had!

I have since spent many hours under the shearing shed shovelling sheep sh** which is I proving the garden greatly. I like the idea of the dead animals but (a) my housemates would not agree and (b) I have dogs who will happily jump into the garden enclosure and dig around if it smells of death. I will however try to put up some shades for those hot days.

I feel very rude for not replying since you took the time to answer so thanks a lot for the replies and the photos!
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