Keeping tomatoes for their seeds

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Keeping tomatoes for their seeds

Postby mick89 » Tue Dec 29, 2015 9:13 am

Hi All,

This Spring/Summer i managed to germinate the following tomatoe crops from seedlings:

2x Standard Red

2x Yellow

2x Black Russian

The success i had with all is exilerant and i wish to make due with the re planting of the same trees next season.

What method is best for the keeping of the successfull tomatoes produced from this crop. I heard Drying them out and storing them in a container is preffered.

Regards,
Michael From Sydney
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Re: Keeping tomatoes for their seeds

Postby SteveO » Wed Dec 30, 2015 11:00 am

You can just dry them out on some kitchen towel paper and store in a jar, but I prefer to ferment them to prevent the seeds from carrying any diseases on to the next crop.
Just squeeze the pulp into a jar and add some water, put the lid on and leave it alone until a thick mouldy scum appears on the surface, pour them into a sieve and give them a good wash, then you can dry them out and store them. Retaining some of the fermenting liquid and adding it to the next lot of seeds makes the process quicker
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Re: Keeping tomatoes for their seeds

Postby gardenlen » Sat Jan 02, 2016 3:31 pm

as tom' seeds don't have a long shelf life we've taken to just spreading some seeds on a piece of paper towel and let it dry

seems to work ok
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len

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Re: Keeping tomatoes for their seeds

Postby Honeyeaterg » Wed Jan 06, 2016 1:46 am

Best to ferment them as steveo described, once they are washed, lay them on paper towel to dry out (if they touch they will stick together so try to separate them for drying). Once dry you can store them in the fridge. They will be good for at least a few years, The longer you store them the less germination you will get so if you store them for longer it's best to plant more seed to counter the lower germination rate. It sounds like a bit of extra work but the fermenting is to reduce pathogens in the seeds before storing.
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Re: Keeping tomatoes for their seeds

Postby Geoff Clifton » Mon Jan 11, 2016 12:14 pm

Do you know about propagating the suckers and potting them up in a protected spot or greenhouse over winter?
The actual pruning of suckers on non determinate plants is a topic on its own but they are the shoots that come at the leaf junction with the main stem. Fruit shoots are are quite separate.
We've had some toms (esp cherry and small types) continue to produce all through mild winters on cuttings struck in autumn.
A big advantage of using cuttings is they are true to type and not cross pollinated. I'm not certain but this may also work with F1 hybrids which will not reproduce from seed.

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Re: Keeping tomatoes for their seeds

Postby Honeyeaterg » Thu Jan 14, 2016 5:42 am

I'm not certain but this may also work with F1 hybrids which will not reproduce from seed.


I would think so. Hybrids of other plants are grown from cuttings so they are true to the parent so tomatoes should be the same.
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Re: Keeping tomatoes for their seeds

Postby gardenlen » Mon Jan 18, 2016 2:32 pm

with F1 hybrids you could end up with any quality or lack of quality fruit, i've had doozies over he year, they went well in cooking so not a complete waste.

with them yeh i'd be thinking if you like that particular variety grow from cuttings
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len

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May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
A World That You May Not Understand."

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