asparagus foliage

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asparagus foliage

Postby Ann » Thu Apr 27, 2006 11:39 am

I put in asparagus a couple of years ago and did not pick it. Now, what do I do with the mass of feathery foliage? Leave it, or cut it off??? :D
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Postby Sam » Thu Apr 27, 2006 12:32 pm

You've done the right thing, so far.

It may be too late for this year - I'm not sure of the asparagus season in your area.

We left ours over the summer and it did the same thing as yours - when we noticed new shoots coming up, Brian pulled out all of the feathery spears - they just pull out of the ground - and left them.

We were rewarded with a bumper crop - yummy!

Since then I have read that basically we did exactly the right thing for them.

Have a look at the growing guide on the GE site - it should have more information.

Good luck with it - we have loved having our own. When we only get a few spears we just put them in a cup of water in the fridge until we have enough for a bit of a feast. Brian likes them with hollandaise sauce (I should NEVER have introduced him to that!) and I've taken to soft boiling eggs and using the asparagus instead of toast soldiers.

PS - I do cheat's hollandaise - mix equal quantities of thick or dollop cream and mayonnaise. I use the 97% fat free variety and pretend we're being healthy.
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
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Postby Spider Lily » Fri Jun 23, 2006 3:37 pm

Hi Ann and Sam and everyone else, I am thinking of trying my hand at growing asparagus however I have NEVER seen them growing. Did any of you take pics of yours by any chance? Where do you buy them from and how do they come- seed??? I have seen a few on ebay for $9.50 (not end price!) plus postage which was a ridiculous amount but I am not sure how much is a good price.
How much asparagus spears do you get from the plants? How tall do they grow? Any info would be appreciated.

If anyone else has grown asparagus I would appreciate some advice and if you have pics even better.
Thanks
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Postby Sam » Fri Jun 23, 2006 4:07 pm

Perfect timing for you question! Got my new catalogue today - check it out on-line if you haven't received it.

Anyway, they've got asparagus for sale - 2 year old crowns. This means they'll fruit in about 18 months. It probably does grow from seed, but this would be an extremely slow way of doing it.

Check out the GE site for more detailed info about growing conditions.

Also, on Gardening Australia this weekend, Jane Edmonson is doing a feature on growing and caring for the plants.

You get a reasonable amount of spears in the first crop and then more and more each year. Each plant can live for about 20 years, so make sure you are putting them where they can stay.

Good luck and let us know how you get on. You will be completely hooked once you have tasted it from your own garden.

Actually, you could plant one at work - once the spears poke out of the ground, you know you'll be able to eat them within a day or two - I'm sure you could watch them grow - they are so fast - the kids would be fascinated.
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
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Postby Spider Lily » Sat Jun 24, 2006 10:44 am

Thanks Sam, I will definetely make sure to watch GA (I always do however if we are going out sometimes forget to tape It).
Work would be a great place to grow it as we have many places for it to be left undisturbed and the kids would love it.
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Postby Spider Lily » Sat Jun 24, 2006 8:27 pm

Well what a great episode of GA! Jane Edmonson hit the nail on the head when she siad that although people love asparagus very few have seen it growing (well it described me anyway!) I never would have thought asparagus looked like that.
Can't wait for my catalogue now so I can start ordering some!

Thanks again Sam :D
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Postby Ann » Sun Jun 25, 2006 2:42 pm

I knew what it looked like and not to pick, but now I know I can cut it down :D
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Postby Sam » Sun Jun 25, 2006 4:19 pm

My favourite story re asparagus was something a friend overheard in the fresh vege section of a supermarket.

A lady was looking at the bunches of fresh asparagus and complained to her friend that she could never get it to taste like the stuff in the tins.

As my friend said "some people don't deserve fresh produce"...
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
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Postby kitkat » Sun Jun 25, 2006 6:22 pm

tee hee Sam you gotta luv em don't you ....probably even likes those hard tasteless tomatoes too! :lol: :lol: :lol:
I was planning on putting in some asparagus but will wait until the drought breaks (and my dam is full again)as they like a good watering in Summer.
Smiles from SueB
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Postby Ann » Mon Jun 26, 2006 11:41 am

Yeah My daughter will buy supermarket tomatoes even when I have vine ripened ones. :cry: As I don't eat many, I didn;t plant them last year, but got a good crop of seedlings :D
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Postby Luzy » Mon Jun 26, 2006 5:21 pm

What is your daughter doing, Ann!!!???? Sam's right about some people and fresh produce. And, I know that we live in a 'busy' society, but has anyone else noticed all the pre-packaged, pre-prepared produce like carrots and potatoes already peeled and cut up - ready for your saucepan or microwave?????? It seems like there's not much love going into family meals these days. How sad.
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Postby Sam » Mon Jun 26, 2006 5:51 pm

It has taken a bit to get the kids to eat broccoli if it comes from the supermarket!

Honestly, I am so sick of hearing people complain about how to get their kids to eat vegetables...I just turn around and suggest that they grow them. Ours will eat and/or try almost anything if it comes out of our garden.

At least they tried the broccoli that way and will now eat it from the shops.

I bought podding peas recently and they are taking them (raw) in their lunchboxes - partly I think because they were so used to eating them from the garden.

When I cooked them at my sisters I realised it was probably the first time they had had cooked peas!
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
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Postby Pam » Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:53 am

Sam, what time is breakfast at your house? I'll bring the coffee!
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