Lemon Tree in a Pot - Any Suggestions

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Lemon Tree in a Pot - Any Suggestions

Postby DrDuncs » Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:44 pm

I would like to get my hands on a lemon tree to plant into a pot. I saw a "Lots O' Lemons" the other day which I think is a form of Meyer. Any suggestions on a good variety suitable for Vic and for a pot?
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Postby onesimus » Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:53 am

I was looking at lemon trees at the nursery on the weekend and it seemed that every variety in stock was noted as being suitable for growing in a pot (and they had about four different varieties).

I suppose it depends on what you have available in your local area, what kind of fruit you prefer, and how much fruit you want throughout the year.
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Postby Spider Lily » Tue Jun 27, 2006 3:52 pm

I have heard that the Meyer lemon is the most suited to pots and to most climates also.
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Postby Sam » Tue Jun 27, 2006 5:35 pm

There's a couple of different lemons in the new GE catalogue. If you don't have one, click on the link in the top left corner and have a look that way.

While you're there, register for the e-mail specials - they're fantastic!
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
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Postby Luzy » Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:49 pm

Hi DrDuncs!

I can't offer advice on varieties for pots but I would recommend considering a lemon that is grafted onto dwarf rootstock for a pot - unless you've got a really, really huge pot for your lemon. Lemon trees can get very big...

(And the email specials are certainly fantstic! And usually sooo tempting)
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Postby Lotte » Fri Jul 21, 2006 11:49 am

I just bought a Lots A Lemons from Bunnings. I'd been looking around for one for a while and when I saw it, I just had to have it.

I thought it was reasonably expensive for what it is - only about 30 cm high and $30!

Having spent that much, I'll definitely look after it!
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Postby onesimus » Fri Jul 21, 2006 1:47 pm

I saw a small lemon tree on the weekend in BigW. I think it said it was related to the meyer - but I can't be 100% sure I'm remembering correctly.

According to the label it grows to about 1 to 1.5 metres. It cost around $20.00. It seemed to be a new plant in stock. They had plenty of them and they seemed to be in good condition.

If they had arrived a few weeks later I would have been ready to buy one myself.
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Postby Sam » Fri Jul 21, 2006 4:03 pm

I think the 'lots a lemons' one is more expensive because it is grafted onto dwarf root stock, so won't get too huge, but will still produce, hopefully, lots of lemons.
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
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Postby DrDuncs » Sat Jul 22, 2006 9:38 pm

Lotte - would be interested to hear how your lots o' lemons goes although you are in a much warmer climate than me.

I saw a Lots o' Lemons a few weeks ago for around $28 at the local Plant Plus, although couldn't afford it at the time. May go back to get it when I have some $$$'s

Went to the Flower & Garden show earlier this year and saw the grafted multi fruit trees which I thought were pretty cool. Can get either citrus or stone fruit grafted onto the one tree for $20 per fruit (eg lemon, lime & orange on one tree for $60). Very tempted to get one but not sure how well they grow?
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Postby Chris C » Sun Jul 23, 2006 11:39 am

Just for a bit of contrast...

Here's what you can achieve with a large pot and some fairly dedicated neglect. Our potted tree. I think the variety is NottaLottaLemons.... :oops: :P:

Image
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Postby Luzy » Mon Jul 24, 2006 5:06 pm

Chris, I've head that those NottaLottas won't bear if orange ducks are ranging around...
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Postby Chris C » Mon Jul 24, 2006 5:44 pm

Luzy wrote:Chris, I've head that those NottaLottas won't bear if orange ducks are ranging around...


:D

Of course Luzy, why didn't we realise that before. :!: :idea:

We'll have to duck out and buy some other companion for it. A marmalade cat perhaps..... :roll:
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Postby Luzy » Mon Jul 24, 2006 6:00 pm

Isn't there a drenched rooster nearby?

(I'll have to ask the obvious: are you planning to plant the NottaLotta?
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Postby Chris C » Mon Jul 24, 2006 8:07 pm

Luzy,

I don't think that planting was on the cards. Everything in pots is Vicki's domain, and I think the plan was something along the lines of "buy lemon tree, stick in pot, allow tree to do as it pleases....". It's been there for quite a while without either flourishing or fading away. It does get some food and water from time to time and appears contented rather than actually ecstatic with its lot in life. :)

It does produce a few lemons, but not exactly a bumper harvest. The basic "soil" here is clay and rock with all the nutritional attraction of a Coles carpark. So the few trees I have planted out have resolutely remained the same size, despite my attempts to enrich the soil a little first. Only the jacarandah next to the leach drain has prospered. Hence my current use of planter boxes and trailer loads of garden centre soil.
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Postby cordelia » Tue Jul 25, 2006 2:25 am

Chris, Vicki has obviously perfected the art of 'no fuss bonsai'. She should be highly commended for her dedicated research.
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Postby Kalex » Thu Jul 27, 2006 9:53 am

We were given a lemon and a lime tree in lovely big terracotta pots as wedding presents. They're both Dwarfs and I'm pretty sure it's a Meyer lemon. Our friend also planted lovely lobelias around the base of the tree.

They're standing either side of our front doorstep and they get a decent amount of sun. Admittedly, we've only had them for 3 months, but they're flowering and seem to be doing okay.

We were also given another one, and I don't think it's a drawf. We potted it the other day (rental property) and now I'm wondering if that was such a good idea... I'll give it a good prune and if it needs to go to a good home, we'll do that later.

Anyway, you can get dwarf lemons and limes for pot growing!
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Postby cordelia » Fri Jul 28, 2006 3:51 am

Kalex, You lucky thing. Isn't the perfume heavenly? What a lovely wedding gift! Do you know what sort of lime it is?

Does anyone know which limes survive best in cold(!!!) climates? And should they be with or without pottery ducks....?
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Postby Kalex » Tue Aug 01, 2006 1:37 pm

Yes, we're very lucky... a few friends asked us what we wanted and we had just about everything we needed, except a garden, so we asked for plants in terracotta pots, particularly I wanted citrus trees... :lol:

Re what type of lime it is, I THINK it's a tahitian lime... but I'm not 100% sure, as I mis-placed the swing tags. :oops:

Now that you mention they should have a lovely fragrance, I'm not so sure that they're doing well, as mine don't have any fragrance - help!!!

What am I doing wrong? Maybe they shouldn't be in pots? Maybe they're better suited to a warmer climate??? I guess time will tell, but if anyone knows anything... please share.

thanks

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Postby cordelia » Tue Aug 01, 2006 10:31 pm

If they are flowering, you must be doing heaps right. Maybe yours don't have a fragrance? Or more likely you don't smell it in the cool...you may get a waft of it when the sun is warmer on the blossoms...it is a wafty kind of thing.
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