Spring Onions, Garlic & Lemongrass

A forum for problem solving and exchanging ideas and knowledge related to the edible garden. Now includes sub-forum for sharing recipes and other ideas for using produce.

Moderators: Forum_mod, Pam, jack, Sam, Luzy

Spring Onions, Garlic & Lemongrass

Postby Grubby1 » Sat Jul 08, 2006 11:07 am

Hi all,

I hope you are all having a wonderful weekend :D My question is: Can you grow spring onions from the ones that can be bought at the shop? The rather large bunch that I bought has lots of roots and I hoped that I would be able to bung it in a pot or the ground and keep it going. What do you think my chances are?

I'd like to try the same with garlic and lemongrass. I read somewhere that if you put a fresh stalk of lemongrass in a glass of water, it should grow shoots. Has anyone had any success with this? Is there a better time of year to be trying? Thanks :)
User avatar
Grubby1
Cultivator
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2005 10:59 am
Location: Marsden Park, NSW (near Windsor)

Postby kitkat » Sat Jul 08, 2006 3:10 pm

Hi grubby1 , Love your Antarctic avatar ....wonderful imagery!

You can plant your Spring onions and they will keep gowing for you and also garlic bulbs or cloves as long as they are not those pure white bleached ones from China, they are treated to stop them growing.

Not too sure about the Lemongrass, I have heard you can do it but it was never successful for me in the South maybe in it's native Qld it works?Give it a try maybe indoors so it stays warm -nothing ventured nothing gained.

I grew ginger from the supermarket like that and it has never flowered but survives and has even sent up new shoots even in these frosty times.Same with sweet potatoes.
Good luck.
Smiles from SueB
[color=#40BF00]
Thanks for Sharing
Gardens..... food for Body and Soul.[/color]
User avatar
kitkat
Head Curator
 
Posts: 831
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 1:54 pm
Location: South Western Victoria

Postby Sam » Sat Jul 08, 2006 5:19 pm

How was the ginger, Kitkat? Did it become invasive or just stay fairly happy.

I can just see our ginger in sherry production going into overdrive!

Grubby1 - a great alternative to lemon grass, which can become invasive, is a lemon myrtle tree. I've been told that some restaurants are now using the leaves in place of lemon grass. The leaves are lovely when crushed a little (to release flavour) and in a jug of water - gives a lovely lemony taste.
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
User avatar
Sam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 3502
Joined: Sun Apr 27, 2003 3:19 pm
Location: Caboolture, Qld (just nth of Brisbane)

Postby milt » Wed Aug 02, 2006 3:12 pm

Grubby 1

Grab some garlic from an organic fruit / veg shop, plant the cloves you intend to plant pointy side up in Autumn or spring and Bob' your uncle after a few months. When leaves start to dry out yank it out or as soon as a couple of decent leaves pop up it can also be used. The flavour is a little sweeter if you use them before there fully ripe :wink:

Lemon grass I tried growing from a cutting with roots with no success, I ended up purchasing a plant from bunning for a few dollars and it is thriving down here in Melb.

Spring onions??? Hmm grab some organic ones and replant.

Milt,
milt
Head Gardener
 
Posts: 134
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2005 11:21 am
Location: Perth

Postby Spider Lily » Wed Aug 02, 2006 11:07 pm

Can the garlic cloves be planted in those plastic rectangular planter boxes or do they need something deeper? Also how close together can you plant them?
User avatar
Spider Lily
Gardening Sage
 
Posts: 1747
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2006 11:30 am
Location: Sydney, NSW

Postby milt » Thu Aug 03, 2006 12:34 pm

Yes i guess so, i plant mine about 20cm apart as far depth is concerned 20 -30cm of soil should be ok? It will work well for providing you buy good organic garlic to start with. Some like to also gently peel off the dry skin of the clove to help prevent rot in some cases. Don't water to much a gentle rain every now and again is fine. They like a cool moist soil hence why it best to plant in Autumn and Spring.

Milt,
milt
Head Gardener
 
Posts: 134
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2005 11:21 am
Location: Perth

Postby Pam » Thu Aug 03, 2006 6:46 pm

Sam, if you go to the markets at Yandina, you can get ginger rhizomes for a song. It will have a tendency to want to spread, but that can simply be solved by dousing it in sherry - sounds VERY interesting!
User avatar
Pam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 14418
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 1:06 pm
Location: Bundaberg, Qld

Postby Sam » Thu Aug 03, 2006 7:47 pm

We have dug deep into the fridge at times and found 2 year old ginger in sherry - tastes mighty fine. We were always worried about growing, but might just take the plunge!
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
User avatar
Sam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 3502
Joined: Sun Apr 27, 2003 3:19 pm
Location: Caboolture, Qld (just nth of Brisbane)

Postby Luzy » Fri Aug 04, 2006 5:13 pm

Thanks for the reminder, Sam. I've still got a jar left - in the depths of the fridge! :D :D
User avatar
Luzy
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 7297
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 4:44 pm
Location: Melbourne, Vic

Postby Grubby1 » Sun Aug 20, 2006 9:11 am

My deep apologies for being non-responsive :oops: I have been very industrious in the garden. Now, a wee progress report: The spring onion from the shop took off with a bang as did the garlic. Very exciting! The lemongrass from the shop idea turned out to be a no-goer. The stalks are too dry with not even a hint of a root. Perhaps someone is onto what people do with store-bought produce!

My dear dad gave me a membership for Christmas last year to Diggers Club, so I ended up ordering a lemongrass plant from them, along with alot of other things!

The plan is to keep the lemongrass in a large pot as I have since read and been told that it can just go rampant and be a hell of a thing to remove.

And thanks kitkat for the compliment on my avatar! It actually came as a wallpaper for my mobile phone :)
User avatar
Grubby1
Cultivator
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2005 10:59 am
Location: Marsden Park, NSW (near Windsor)

Postby Pam » Sun Aug 20, 2006 6:25 pm

2 year old ginger in sherry


Instructions would be nice............. as would a sample! :lol: :lol:
User avatar
Pam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 14418
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 1:06 pm
Location: Bundaberg, Qld

Postby Ann » Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:40 pm

If lemon grass is likely to go rampant just keep it potted. It's amazing what grows just in pots :D
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
User avatar
Ann
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 2:44 pm
Location: Esperance, WA south coast

Postby milt » Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:54 pm

My lemon grass is in a large pot and is thriving, a little bit of plant food every now and again and a prune a few times a year is all thats required.

We use it when cooking fish fillets and in warm winter chicken soups as well.

Milt,
milt
Head Gardener
 
Posts: 134
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2005 11:21 am
Location: Perth

Postby cordelia » Tue Aug 22, 2006 3:11 am

Well done to have a thriving lemongrass plant! But tell us how to make a chicken soup with lemongrass! Recipes?
User avatar
cordelia
Senior Curator
 
Posts: 740
Joined: Thu Jun 08, 2006 2:09 am
Location: Canberra

Postby Pam » Tue Aug 22, 2006 5:59 am

Forget it cordelia - the recipes are a carefully guarded family secret! :wink:
User avatar
Pam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 14418
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 1:06 pm
Location: Bundaberg, Qld

Postby milt » Tue Aug 22, 2006 8:42 am

Lemongrass Chicken soup recipe:

Grab a couple of chicken carcases and a few drumsticks for meat, add a handfull off lemon grass leaves that have been bruised "bashed with a cleaver to release the oils" add salt to taste, for me a couple good pinches of it. Boil it all in a stock pot for 90 mins. Keep adding water to keep chicken covered

Seperate chicken from stock by using a colander. Boil approx half a cup of rice in the stock whilst picking off bits of chicken of the carcease and drumsticks to put back into the soup stock. Once rice is ready your almost there.

Squeeze a lemon into a cup, hand beat an egg in your mixing bowl and slowly add the lemon juice to it whilst continueosly beating. Finally with a laddle slowly add the hot stock to the egg lemon mixture until mixing bowl is kind of half full. Then pour it all back in the stock pot, cook for 1minute and you have a wonderfull tasty scented lemongrass chicken soup.

And its actually very good for you particularly if you have a cold or flu as well.

Milt,
milt
Head Gardener
 
Posts: 134
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2005 11:21 am
Location: Perth

Postby Pam » Tue Aug 22, 2006 8:47 am

It sounds yummy, Milt, but my hubby doesn't like soup!:cry:

Now if we could only get instructions for the ginger in sherry?!
User avatar
Pam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 14418
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 1:06 pm
Location: Bundaberg, Qld

Postby midgin » Tue Aug 22, 2006 12:17 pm

I thought Sam meant that she keeps her ginger in sherry for future use, IE.t he sherry preserves the ginger.... I could be VERY wrong.. :?
Don't be afraid to colour outside the lines.
User avatar
midgin
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 6188
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 4:54 pm
Location: Lake Macquarie,NSW Temperate.

Postby Pam » Tue Aug 22, 2006 12:21 pm

Ohhhhhhh! I see.
User avatar
Pam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 14418
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 1:06 pm
Location: Bundaberg, Qld

Postby Sam » Tue Aug 22, 2006 1:53 pm

Instructions would be nice............. as would a sample!


Hi Pam - we just cut the fresh, peeled ginger into small pieces and marinate in sherry. It lasts for ages and gives a lovely flavour. Then use the sherry in cooking (or I know people who just drink it) when the ginger is finished.
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
User avatar
Sam
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 3502
Joined: Sun Apr 27, 2003 3:19 pm
Location: Caboolture, Qld (just nth of Brisbane)

Next

Return to Fruit and Produce

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron