Spring Onions, Garlic & Lemongrass

A forum for problem solving and exchanging ideas and knowledge related to the edible garden. Now includes sub-forum for sharing recipes and other ideas for using produce.

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Postby Pam » Tue Aug 22, 2006 2:02 pm

Thanks Sam. Does it matter what kind of sherry?
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Postby Sam » Tue Aug 22, 2006 2:08 pm

Brian gets the ginger at the local markets and buys a lot when he sees it because it isn't there very often. So fresh that when he cuts it it actually drips!

For this reason, we tend to use cask sherry - probably medium, depending on your taste.

I think it was Luzy who mixed garlic cloves in with hers when she tried it.
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
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Postby cordelia » Wed Aug 23, 2006 4:02 am

Thanks milt for the yummy sounding recipe!
Pam and luzy...what is the story of the garlic and ginger in sherry?

Train of thought..I once had prunes stuffed with marzipan and put in a jar with port......yummy, and it makes very good christmas presents.
Has anyone ever had pickled green walnuts?
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Postby Pam » Wed Aug 23, 2006 5:39 am

Pam and luzy...what is the story of the garlic and ginger in sherry?


cordelia, that was what I was asking about - I have no idea!

Cherries in port is pretty yummy too - the only problem with giving them as Christmas presents would be that you woud then have less for yourself! :lol:
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Postby Sam » Wed Aug 23, 2006 9:30 am

Sorry - we preserve the ginger in the sherry.

Just peel and chop up into useful size pieces (I don't like putting pieces back into the bottle), put into a bottle and cover with sherry.

We keep it in a dark place until we open the jar, and then keep in the fridge.

The sherry keeps the ginger nice and fresh and gives a nice flavour, and then the sherry is good to cook with when you've finished the ginger.

It keeps for ages - I have found two year old jars lurking in the back of the fridge and it is still fine.

Great when you can get really good fresh ginger - and makes a great Christmas present.
“Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian, wine and tarragon
make it French, sour cream makes it Russian, lemon and
cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
makes it good.” Alice May Brock, Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook.
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Postby Luzy » Wed Aug 23, 2006 7:17 pm

Sam's Sherry and Ginger recipe is excellent (Y) , especially as my sources are quite seasonal and it's only once or twice a year that I can buy ginger when it looks like it's bursting out of its skin, as opposed to ready for the compost.

I have also peeled and roughly chopped garlic in with the ginger - both are preserved really well and the flavours are fantastic. (I did find another little jar in the back of the fridge, too, Sam :lol: ).

I mainly use it when I'm cooking quail, just spooning the sherry and ginger (and garlic) over the little beasts before baking them. Sometimes I've stuffed the chopped ginger into the cavities, sometimes not. Either way, it gives a great flavour to the quail - and to the final gravy.

The best bit is how easy it is to just spoon (or pour) some into whatever you're cooking. Nah - the best bit is the flavour! :D
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Postby midgin » Thu Aug 24, 2006 7:27 am

Luzy, I have to ask is quail fiddly to eat? :?:
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Postby Luzy » Thu Aug 24, 2006 6:10 pm

Absolutely, midgin! :lol: We usually make a big affair out of a quail feast, with heaps of serviettes and a big bowl for the bones in the centre of the table.

I try to let them 'steam' in the sherry a bit first when baking, just with foil over the dish, so that the meat comes off the bones easily, and then take the foil off and brown them in the last 30 minutes or so.

Definitely a messy dinner! :lol:
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Postby midgin » Thu Aug 24, 2006 6:25 pm

But delicious I am sure...
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Postby cordelia » Fri Aug 25, 2006 3:50 am

Luzy, When is the next quail feast, and will you send out invites? All these yummy recipes make my cooking seem suddenly shabby :oops: :oops: My only defence is that until now food has been for large quantities of edible nutrition rather than delicate culinary experience. Hmmm.
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