tomato plant flowering too soon

A forum for problem solving and exchanging ideas and knowledge related to the edible garden. Now includes sub-forum for sharing recipes and other ideas for using produce.

Moderators: Forum_mod, Pam, jack, Sam, Luzy

tomato plant flowering too soon

Postby Spider Lily » Sun Aug 20, 2006 3:29 pm

Hi everyone,

a couple of months ago I planted some tomato seeds in egg cartons. They met an early demise when they colided with some wind which blew the tray across the yard one day. One tomato seedling survived and a couple of weeks ago I planted it in a very narrow little patch where I would normally put herbs in.
Now there are flowers on the tomato which is only about 30cm tall. Should I pick them off? Has this happened because I have resticted it's growth due to where it is planted? I think it is a Russian red.

Here is a photo to show you where it is planted:

Image
Last edited by Spider Lily on Mon Aug 21, 2006 7:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Spider Lily
Gardening Sage
 
Posts: 1747
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2006 11:30 am
Location: Sydney, NSW

Postby Ann » Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:36 pm

The weather's been funny, but you could be right. It's a trick to get plants to flower-restricting the growth in some way. If there is enough sun, you coupld always just keep it well fed :lol: Maybe you'll have early tomatoes :lol:
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
User avatar
Ann
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2003 2:44 pm
Location: Esperance, WA south coast

Postby Spider Lily » Mon Aug 21, 2006 1:30 pm

I have had it indoors in my back room for the past nearly 3 months which gets lots of sun through large windows and makes the room really warm but now I think maybe I should have put it in a larger pot and left it indoors a bit longer.
Aren't russian reds supposed to be "big". I may have just created a "cherry russian red" :( :lol:

PS Talk about funny weather I have a self seeded petunia that has "stayed alive" through winter. It flowered until May but has still not died down like it usually does!
User avatar
Spider Lily
Gardening Sage
 
Posts: 1747
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2006 11:30 am
Location: Sydney, NSW

Postby Luzy » Thu Aug 24, 2006 6:18 pm

Hi Spider Lily,

It's taken me ages to find some of Peter Cundall's words of wisdom re tomatoes - this is a little bit from a section that he starts with: 'I'm being terribly cruel to my tomatoes again... '

Anyway, it goes on to say that being tough on young tomato seedlings frightens them into flowering much earlier as they think they're going to die. Once they start to flower, tomato plants will never go to fat and put all of their energy into forming fruit, so now it's time to stop 'starving' them. Use weak liquid fetiliser (compost tea or manure tea).

So, it sounds like you might have some beautiful early tomatoes! Do you reckon that it can stay where it is - or do you need to transplant it?
User avatar
Luzy
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 7297
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 4:44 pm
Location: Melbourne, Vic

Postby Spider Lily » Thu Aug 24, 2006 9:41 pm

So Luzy are you saying it is a good thing that it is flowering now? I thought I had completely stuffed it right up.

I will leave it where it is now as I don't want to put it into more shock.

Excuse my ignorance but what is compost/manure tea :?
User avatar
Spider Lily
Gardening Sage
 
Posts: 1747
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2006 11:30 am
Location: Sydney, NSW

Postby Luzy » Fri Aug 25, 2006 9:21 am

The way I read what Peter Cundall wrote - it's a good thing! And your plant will put all its energy into making fruit rather than lots of lush growth.

The compost/manure 'tea' is something that Peter recommends regularly - there's probably a real recipe for it on the GA website????!!?? :? But, from his book, he advises:

A drum of water into whiich a few bucketfulls of compost has been mixed produces 'compost tea', a pale-brown liquid which can be watered around tomato or other quick growing plants to supply most of their needs. If animal maure is also mixed into the drum the resulting brew is much darker and stronger - break this down with water to make it look like weak tea before being fed to the soil around the plants.

He also advises to mulch around the plants so they can also get nutrients from the mulch and to water well (not let dry out) when they are bearing fruit.

Guess you've got nothing to lose and yummy tomatoes to gain???? :? 8)
User avatar
Luzy
Garden Wizard
 
Posts: 7297
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 4:44 pm
Location: Melbourne, Vic

Postby Spider Lily » Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:38 pm

Thanks Luzy, now that you mention it I think I have seen it on an episode of GA and I think Marrion used to do the same.

I saw Peter Cundall today at the GA gardening expo but was too embarrassed to say anything to him. I thought about it but chickened out in the end :shock: The poor man was getting mobbed by everyone who wanted to shake hands with him!
User avatar
Spider Lily
Gardening Sage
 
Posts: 1747
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2006 11:30 am
Location: Sydney, NSW


Return to Fruit and Produce

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron