Birds and Fruit & Nuts

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Birds and Fruit & Nuts

Postby popandjan » Tue Sep 09, 2003 2:05 pm

:D
We love our many and varied birds and we encourage them, however we would be most pleased to learn how to stop them eating our produce; in other words, we would like the best of both worlds :o
Always interested in anything that will grow in the Highlands...cool...area of SE Qld
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Fruit trees

Postby Ann » Wed Sep 10, 2003 4:26 pm

Short of building a cage to cover the trees, or covering part with a net, I don't think you can. It seems to be a case of being prepared to share with the birds. 8)
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Fruit and Birds

Postby Gabrielle » Wed Oct 27, 2004 1:23 pm

I have heard of a bird scarer that is currently available thru http://www.hawkbirdscarer.com it offers a money back guarantee, worth looking into
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Postby Ann » Thu Oct 28, 2004 6:23 pm

People with flowers that get eaten from rose bushes say that old CD's or twisted strips of foil may work as they twist around in the breeze. But a fruit tree is a bit bigger. Recycle cask fillers, maybe?
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Birds and Fruit & Nuts

Postby Marrion » Fri Oct 29, 2004 7:56 pm

I bought a humming tape from my local nursery, it really works, you stretch it between two stakes and it hums and deters the birds.
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bird scarer

Postby Kerrie » Tue Nov 02, 2004 7:19 pm

Hanging old cd's from the branches with enough string so that they swivel easily definitely works. The birds don't like the sudden movement and reflection. Beware of using this around any nests, though, unless you want to scare the birds off permanently.

We used to use strings of the old foil milk bottle caps to keep birds away from seeds and seedlings ... ahh, those were the days :)

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Postby Ann » Wed Nov 03, 2004 7:29 pm

Another of us showing their age :cry: I remember making pompoms from the hole-in-the-centre cardboard milk bottle tops!!! :D
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Postby Lea » Wed Nov 17, 2004 3:15 pm

Hey, Kerrie and Ann, I too will probably be showing my age here, but I couldn't resist sharing the memory ... as a little girl, we always had highly amusing difficulties with the Australian ravens getting to the milk bottles before we did, after the milk had been delivered and was still sitting in our front yard ... the ravens would put their beaks through those old foil bottle tops, puncturing the foil to get at the milk :lol: Australian ravens are indeed very clever :lol:

Clever enough, though, to be wary of movement and sparkly objects ... that's a good idea, with the CDs or similar, hanging and moving to protect fruit and vegetables. I might try it with our tomatoes later in the season ... almost all our tomatoes last year gave the birds a great feed! I wouldn't want to permanently scare any of them off, though ... don't forget that birds are extremely valuable in the garden for keeping insect populations down. And with the birds eating the insects, there's no need to use any potentially dangerous chemicals at all.

Also, it's a very good idea to be mindful of string or twine whenever you use it in your garden, and never let it get into the environment where it will damage birds and wildlife ... check out my website page about Tinky the Australian Magpie Lark if you're interested ... please be careful about disposing of string, twine, plastic, properly and safely to avoid pain and suffering to our magnificent birds and animal life.
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Milk bottles

Postby Kerrie » Thu Nov 18, 2004 12:55 pm

I was thinking of you guys the other day, I was picking up some bargain pots at Bunnings for my verandah, and two of the staff were exclaiming over some of the items they were trying to clear - they had discovered an excess stock of wire milk bottle holders! I remember these from 30 years ago and was extremely surprised to see them around - who gets milk bottles delivered anymore??

I don't know if you remember them - a grid of wire that holds 4 bottles with a handle running down the middle. Very odd to see a modern accessory being produced for a service that hasn't existed for a couple of decades!

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Thanks.

Postby Shotgun Paul. » Mon Feb 07, 2005 3:25 pm

Afternoon Ladies,

I would like to say thank you for making feel like a young fella.
You have made my day and bought back some old memories of
yesteryear,mainly the razor strop do any of our male members
remember what they are and the effect they had,I do.

Have a nice day one and all.

Regards,
Paul.
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Postby Ann » Mon Feb 07, 2005 4:04 pm

The birds used to peck at the milk bottles in the UK too,and I think it was the tits and not just the crows. My father just used the flat of his hand when we needed it!!! Not often, but just enough to respect it!!
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Postby Ann » Tue Feb 08, 2005 2:42 pm

I have just had a tip on another forum. This person got fed up with the birds eating her fruit, took a picture of a cat, printed it on A4 and laminated it, then hung it from a tree. Plenty of fruit as the birds steer clear. Def worth a try, Paul
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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cats

Postby Kerrie » Wed Feb 09, 2005 7:44 am

Oh I LIKE that one!
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Postby Herby » Sun Aug 14, 2005 9:30 pm

Hi everyone,

Wanted to tell my bird story.

well we have had two pidgeons in our backyard as long as i can remember,
the're just wild pidgeons and don't really know why they sit
around here all day.

anyways.. about a year ago I started buying cleaned wheat
from the supermarket and tossing them a handful every couple of days.
soon there were two baby pidgeons aswell.

I got really excited 'cos I thought by feeding them, it encouraged
them to breed as there was a steady supply of food.

anyways.. a couple weeks later, there was 7 pidgeons.
which I then started to feed 2 or 3 handfuls so everyone got a good feed.
well, about a month later there was about 16 pidgeons aswell
as three pidgeons with like feathers on their heads.
they sound like bells ringing when they take off.

so then about 3 months into it, I decided to go to a grain supply place
to buy bulk wheat rather than paying $7 for 3kg.
couldn't believe it is only $17 for 40kg!
so I went nuts! :lol:

I was feeding them like half a bucket of wheat a day. :shock:
lost count at over 40 pidgeons by now.
almost qualified for permanent residency in my yard.
I would walk out the back and look on my roof and there they would all be, waiting for fiesta!

well it obviously got out of control, I didn't mind a sack of wheat a fortnight, but the chocolate coloured roof tiles were really taking a beating by the pidgeon poo, and when would they stop? 100? 200?

the Italian lady up the road told me that there is a man
in the next block that breeds them to eat!
she said that the ones i'm feeding might be his anyways,
and he's just gonna eat more now since thay were so fat. :(

so unfortunately i've had to stop feeding them, it's been a good three weeks now, there are still those couple that hang around all day, I feed them just a small handfull so they eat it quick and don't leave any for others to see it.

I'm building a grand chook coop and will have 8 - 10 laying hens.
can't wait and will have some feathered friends to feed again :)

Ben
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Postby Kerrie » Mon Aug 15, 2005 11:08 am

LOL, Ben, that's a lovely story.
There's a house we drive past on the 'school run' each morning, we've given the owner the title of "The Pigeon Man" as his house is permanently covered with a flock of pigeons and seagulls. He's obviously been feeding them for years, I reckon he scatters a couple of packets of bread and seed each day. There's nothing in his front yard but grass, a birdbath and a feeding table.
I'm pretty sure the house is rented rather than bought, it makes me wonder what will happen when the old guy moves out.

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Postby kitkat » Tue Aug 16, 2005 5:33 pm

I have a tin cutout of a lifesize cat ..painted black.... and I sit it in my apricot tree when the fruit is ripening and on the grapevine later....doesn't seem to deter all birds but does keep off most, parrots particularly.Nothing seems to scare miners or sparrows permanently though.
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