Lemon Tree

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Lemon Tree

Postby chelle » Wed Nov 10, 2004 2:28 pm

What are the secrets to having a beautiful well bearing lemon tree. If you can share any great hints please do!!!!
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Postby Ann » Thu Nov 11, 2004 12:32 pm

I think the secret is lots of sunshine, plenty water and good food. A bit like us :D
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Postby Astar » Thu Nov 11, 2004 1:49 pm

Chelle, if you go back over some of the previous topics in Fruit and Produce, you may get a few ideas there :twisted:
Flowers are like people, each unique in their own way.
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Postby Lea » Thu Nov 11, 2004 2:44 pm

Hey again, Chelle ... not that any regulars here want to ever discourage anyone from posting :twisted: :roll: Communicating with fellow gardeners is invaluable as well as enjoyable! I too have just begun our own garden, three years ago now, and we planted a young mandarin tree. It's been in two-and-a-half years now, and we were thrilled last summer when it produced two tiny mandarins, not normal size, but we ate them and they were sweet and delicious, even more delicious because they were from our tree :D How old is your lemon tree?

There's a guy who posts here who I'm sure you'll meet, Jack, and he drew my attention to the fact that our two small mandarin fruits grew on the side of the tree where we'd been throwing more fertiliser, and even hay, around (we didn't pay as much attention to the ground on the other side of the mandarin tree because it's covered by a very large azalea). So I think that the more you nurture a citrus tree, the better ... I'm not one for one particular type of fertiliser, I prefer to try different products at different times, which I think is even better because one gets a range of nutrients from the different products. One word of advice on fertilisers, though, be careful with the salt-like ones ... they can burn and damage things ... slow-release is preferable and safer.

And mulch (I like hay because it gradually breaks down and adds nutrients to the soil ... I've read that hay in particular is great for encouraging earthworms to your soil, and worms are excellent for aeration, so that water and nutrients can penetrate easier, and for further nutrients deep in the soil from their droppings!) but be careful to keep the mulch away from the bark of the trunk ... you don't want anything building up around the base of the trunk, because citrus are prone to trunk-rot if this is allowed to happen.

And as Ann said, plenty of water, at least for the first couple of years, to help the fertiliser reach deeply, and to give the trees long, cool drinks to enable them to root deeply and develop healthily!

Let us know how your trees are going! What else have you planted?
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Postby Astar » Fri Nov 12, 2004 11:31 pm

This :twisted: was a reference to some of the ideas on a posting on citrus trees some time back. I hope I never gave the wrong impression by using it :!:
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Postby Lea » Wed Nov 17, 2004 2:30 pm

No worries, Astar :D
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