what fruit trees should I plant

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what fruit trees should I plant

Postby Adam » Sat Jan 29, 2005 8:08 pm

He I live in NSW and I have some room in my back yard and I wan't to plant so fruit trees but I do not Know what to plant :?:
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Postby Ann » Sun Jan 30, 2005 2:05 pm

Did you see on BHG where Noni planted multi-graft trees for the max fruit in a small area? :D
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Postby jack » Thu Apr 28, 2005 1:57 am

what did you end up planting?
me i would plant what you like eating, citrus come in flying dragon label now days which are dwarf varietys, peaches come as pixies which are dwarf, most fruit trees take well to espalier, so a fruit orchard no longer has to be on a quarter acre. so i do hope you planted several trees. just remember with citrus but same for most fruit trees, is remove flowers and fruit till the tree reaches a decent height, otherwise it commits more energy to a few fruit than to establishing.
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Postby Herby » Thu Sep 01, 2005 3:03 pm

Never thought of dwarf varieties of fruit trees,
I wanted a fruit tree of some sort in the front.
but mostly the labels say they grow 4m high x 4m wide
much too big for my front yard.
also not being a very good pruner, (funny i'm ranked pruner here)
i think i should be able to manage mini trees :)

So i'm looking for that dwarf variety of peach you mention jack,
and one more drawf fruit of some sorts.
I have cleared a spot ready for 'em, must go and find them now.
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Postby Ann » Thu Sep 01, 2005 5:51 pm

If you watch Gardening Australia, tou would have seen how Peter Cundall espaliered the fruit trees for max crop, minimum space. :D And he showed how to keep them pruned recently. :D That may be your best way to go. :D
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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more trees

Postby jack » Thu Sep 01, 2005 6:34 pm

another small tree to try is the Ballerina range of dwarf apple cultivars Waltz, Bolero and Polka, they need no pruning and are perfect for small spaces as they grow 1-2m tall on a single stem.
Another idea is look at shrubs if height is restricted, one suggestion are berries and a perfect one which i love is Blueberries, they belong to the Azalea group of plants and need the same acid growing conditions. The spineless shrubs can be evergreen or deciduous, they grow from 1-3 metres in height and are known to live longer than 30 years.
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Postby Herby » Fri Sep 02, 2005 12:33 am

Hi again,

whew, finally got to sit down.
very busy day, I did lots of searching and found a dwarf peach! :D
also managed to finally fire up my digital camera that i got
like in april :roll:

I considered apples but a friend has 3 big apples that i pick from anyways.
stone fruits are my fav', I have a plum, had two but i cut one
down to make way for the chook pen.
and two plums were a bit much in the backyard as we don't
make grappa anymore, i have tried but all i make is
plum scented alcoholic vinegar :lol:

yeah so anyways the tree is called pixzee peach,
it is quite small, has no leaves but seems to have
some new growth and little buds.

lol, oh yeah i have a camera, here she is...
promise you won't laugh? :oops:
The tree itself is only 2 ft tall i'd say.
not a great choice as there was only two so hope i didn't buy a dud.

Image

Pretty impressive aye? :lol:
well i scanned the label and this is how it should look one day..

Image

now i hear that there's a pixie nectarine and think that will be the
second choice, but i think i'll wait 'till next year for that one.

frost is sorta ending now, would it be ok to go straight in now?
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Postby Herby » Fri Sep 02, 2005 12:34 pm

Here's my lemon/orange tree
my dad grafted it in the early 90's from our neighbours orange.
the lemon is 25 years or so.
it has barely produced oranges up until the past couple years
since i started opening up the space around it by cutting away
lemon branches.

This year we had a very nice crop of oranges, i have cut away
an entire trunk of lemon now and already the orage is
growing little branches all heading towards the big gap.
I hope to get it at about 80% orange 20% lemon in a few years.

this side of the tree is the best, virtually split it in two
the lemon part on the left, orange on the right.
behind the orange part, is a huge hole were more lemon was.

Image
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Postby Luzy » Fri Sep 02, 2005 8:10 pm

(Y) Another impressive display, cardhed. And some more proof that small gardens can give lots of produce! Your Dad must be pretty handy in the garden, too.
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Postby Herby » Fri Sep 02, 2005 10:13 pm

yeah he was a very creative backyard gardener,
since he passed on about 9 years ago, i've sorta taken over the garden
aspect and who knows, maybe i'm drawn to the backyard as it's
where we spent most our time together and there's sort of a thing still happening there :)
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Postby Herby » Mon Sep 05, 2005 2:18 pm

Well the peach is in Image..........................................................What are these called? don't want to mow the lawn now.

ImageImage
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Postby Luzy » Mon Sep 05, 2005 2:26 pm

Hi Herby,

New name, new look - nice :D

Congratulations on your peach. Looks like a nice blossom or two, as well! And the yellow flower - I'd say sour grass, or soub sob, or something else depending what state you're in. Very pretty and very hard to get rid of (a type of oxalis, I'm guessing).
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Postby Ann » Mon Sep 05, 2005 2:38 pm

Oh, yes, that's Oxalis :cry: :cry: One of the worst things to get rid of as it grows from multiple underground bulbils. Do not mulch the garden with th lawn clippings or you will spread it . :cry: :cry: I know :cry: :cry: My lawn is full of it too, and I spread it. :cry: I am trying to stop it flowering, and just pulling it out of the garden bed. That's today's work. :D
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Postby Herby » Mon Sep 05, 2005 3:06 pm

it should be ok to compost?
but i like it, it's like a lazy man's flower :D
i was quite impressed with my effort :P

6 months ago someone told me i had a huge bindi problem or something,
so I weed n feeded it, this oxalis has replaced the bindi and appart from the full sun spots,
everywhere else it's umm... everywhere
Image
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Postby Luzy » Mon Sep 05, 2005 4:50 pm

Guess it depends on how much you love it, though personally I wouldn't compost it (yellow flowers ABSOLUTELY everywhere. If you dig one up you'll see a big bulby thing with lots and lots and lots of little bulby things. Apparantly some oxalis are edible (as is couch) - another one of those things I don't really fancy :lol:
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Postby Herby » Mon Sep 05, 2005 7:30 pm

ok well i'll have to mow the lawn then and bin it.
and try and pull them bulbies out.
thanks..
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Postby Luzy » Tue Sep 06, 2005 6:41 pm

You could mow around it, Ben. And then try and keep it out of what you don't want it to be in. Just depends on how much you love it :shock: It is incredibly pretty, especially in large 'plantings' (some would call them investations). There are quite a few places around your area that has lots of yellow that glows in the sun at the moment.

Then again, you could just not mow at all - it'll only grow back, anyway :lol:
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Postby Ann » Wed Sep 07, 2005 4:19 pm

I KNOW I spread most of it with the mulch because it was not there when I moved in two years ago and now it needs doing every two weeks. :cry: :cry: It does give a nice green look to the lawn, but just bin it!! :D
I'm a bit like Bruce's spider; try, try, try again. Sonas, Ann
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Postby Herby » Wed Sep 07, 2005 5:03 pm

Yes it does look very lush, it's only in the front so i will bin that batch
until i can control it somehow, more fruit trees maybe :D
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Postby kitkat » Wed Sep 07, 2005 9:52 pm

when we were kids ( I'm heading to 60 next year) we used to eat the stems of oxalis, we called it lemongrass and the stems actually taste like tangy lemon.I ate one today to check if it still tastes the same ...it does! :lol: maybe it would add tang to salads?

The galahs here love the stuff and dig the bulbs as well as the nutgrass bulbs...they have joined a pair of rosellas the last few days and are digging over my east paddock.
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