Green Manure

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Green Manure

Postby Sam » Mon Jun 27, 2005 3:17 pm

We thought we'd give green manure a try in our vegie garden - the soil had not been improved for some time, so we planted Alfalfa Lucerne seeds. Here's the result:

Image

The soil was easy to turn over and looks very refreshed.
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Sam
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Postby Pam » Tue Jul 05, 2005 6:13 am

Sam, did you use an innoculant, of simply plant the seeds as they were?
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Postby Sam » Tue Jul 05, 2005 7:13 am

We just scattered the seeds - alfalfa lucerne from Diggers Club. We're planting (hopefully) next weekend into the bed and see how it goes. The soil just looked fantastic as soon as we turned it over.

What is an innoculant? Now I'm curious/worried!!
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Postby Pam » Tue Jul 05, 2005 7:21 am

Sam, lucerne farmers innoculate their soil with microorganisms prior to sowing the seed to improve germination rate. It's not essential (obviously), and I was just curious.

I bought some seed from the health food store a while ago (for sprouting) I might throw some in the vegie-garden-to-be while it's doing nothing and grow some hay.
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Postby Sam » Tue Jul 05, 2005 1:41 pm

Definately not required, then. We've been more than happy with the result - we planted this about 12 weeks or so ago, I'd say. I'll let you know how the next crop goes in the bed.
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Postby bundyrumman » Sun Jul 10, 2005 7:41 pm

Sam well done. As i grow lucerne for a living which is sold to both horse and cattle feed i no a fair bit about it. We do not treat the seed with innoculant only if cut worm is about this helps prevent the seedling being eaten off. Why dont u leave the lucerne grow and when it highier mow it with your lawn mower and put around your plants. Make sure you dry it a little or it may kill your plants as it will heat. Also you could plant a ceral crop like barley or wheat it really is good for the soil.

Good luck with the lucerne growing :wink:
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Postby Pam » Mon Jul 11, 2005 5:53 am

bundyrumman, you have me curious - how does innoculation have an affect upon the cutworm?
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Postby Guest » Mon Jul 11, 2005 8:21 pm

It is normally a chemical called lorsban or chlophos not sure how u spell it which kills cutworm. Lorsban is used a lot with both vegies and fodder crops to kill cutworms cand crubs of all kinds. It has a long withholding period and is both powder and liquid form. :D
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Cutworm

Postby Guest » Mon Jul 11, 2005 8:22 pm

It is normally a chemical called lorsban or chlophos not sure how u spell it which kills cutworm. Lorsban is used a lot with both vegies and fodder crops to kill cutworms cand crubs of all kinds. It has a long withholding period and is both powder and liquid form. :D
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