DAM REEDS

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DAM REEDS

Postby boogs » Thu Jan 31, 2008 12:49 pm

Hi, This is my first time here. My daughter has a dam on her new property and the entire dam is full of reeds. You cannot even see any water. What should she do. I understand reeds are good but they need to be thinned out. I would appreciate any help.
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby Kieran F » Thu Jan 31, 2008 12:56 pm

welcome to the forums
only solution i can see is if you got in and pulled them out.
but wait for some more replies.
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby Mister Wisteria » Thu Jan 31, 2008 2:22 pm

Welcome Boogs, I think pulling them out is the only way short of bowling over the whole lot if you use any chemicals or such. Many years ago I used to help a friend out that had a very large pond, she had numerous water plants in pots in the water but also had weeds, reeds and what not growing there as well, we just pulled them out, they came out pretty easy. :D
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby guzzigirl » Thu Jan 31, 2008 8:39 pm

perhaps you could contact the state department responsible for waterways - they may have some suggestions for you.
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby Pam » Fri Feb 01, 2008 6:20 am

Mister Wisteria wrote: bowling over the whole lot if you use any chemicals or such.


:shock: Please don't do that!!

Reeds are good Boogs, but your daughter's patch does sound just a little bit excessive. My response would have been to attempt to pull them out too, but Guzzi's suggestion would hopefully provide a solution that is far simpler.
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby Longy » Fri Feb 01, 2008 6:31 am

The easiest way to get them out is with an excavator, depending on the size of the dam. While it's there, maybe get him to deepen a portion of the dam to a point where the reeds can't grow. They have requirements re' depth of water. If it's too deep they won't come back there.
You need about 1/3 of the dam covered. Too much shade prevents the aquatic life below the plants from being healthy.
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby Pam » Fri Feb 01, 2008 6:42 am

Longy wrote: They have requirements re' depth of water. If it's too deep they won't come back there.


Longy, are you able to tell me roughly how deep they will handle, please?
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby boogs » Fri Feb 01, 2008 9:35 am

Thankyou everyone. :D PAM: I am not sure how deep the dam is. We will try to measure it next time we go over to visit. Thanks to all again...
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby boylesg » Fri Feb 01, 2008 10:14 am

boogs wrote:Thankyou everyone. :D PAM: I am not sure how deep the dam is. We will try to measure it next time we go over to visit. Thanks to all again...

The reason why reeds have taken over the dam is that it is to shallow. Most reeds wont grow in water more than about a metre deep I think. So, if yo get an excavator in, then make sure you increase the central depth of the water so that the reeds only grow around the outside of the dam only.

You can use Roundup Biactive over water by the way and it is supposed to be easy on the frogs and fish etc. Glyphosate will work on reeds but you hmay have to give them a few belts with it to kill the roots and rhizomes.

Why don't you plant a greater variety of indigenous aquatic plants so you have something more interesting to look. Nothing is more intersting and attractive than good biodiversity. Here are some suggestions:

Myriophyllum crispatum
Triglochin prcoera
Villarsia reniformis
Hydrocotyl verticillata
Potemogeton tricarinatus
Pratia pedunculata
Lobelia pratioides
Mentha australis
Alissima plantago-aquatica
Persicaria decipiens
Carex
Mazus pumilo
Marsilea
Lythrum salicaria
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby Pam » Fri Feb 01, 2008 10:26 am

boylesg wrote:
You can use Roundup Biactive over water by the way and it is supposed to be easy on the frogs and fish etc.


I certainly won't be testing their 'claims' on mine! :roll:
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby boylesg » Sat Feb 02, 2008 12:28 am

Pam wrote:
boylesg wrote:
You can use Roundup Biactive over water by the way and it is supposed to be easy on the frogs and fish etc.


I certainly won't be testing their 'claims' on mine! :roll:

Fair enough.

I would also be reluctant to go blasting it all over the dam, despite the claims.

Perhaps I would attempt to do small sections at a time and leave a bit of a break in between sprays. Or allow the dam to dry up, spray the Rup and then allow some time for it to break down before re-filling it. Or wait for a mildly windy day and spray from up wind so that most of the drift falls outside the dam - depends what you have outside the dam though.
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby oproudfoot » Sat Feb 02, 2008 2:30 am

I can't really add much to the above advice except to point out that if you go for a 'poisoning' type solution to get rid of the troublesome plants (in this case reeds) in the dam, you are likely to accidentally wipe out some of the species of animals living in the dam as well (turtles, frogs, yabbies, insects etc). Possibly for a long time, depending on the 'half-life' of the chemical you use (which dictates how long it remains 'active'). If however you choose a more 'manual-removal' oriented plan, particularly along the lines of the strategies suggested above whereby the majority of the reeds are manually removed/ the majority of the dam is manually deepened/ excavated BUT a minor section (about 1/3 to 1/4) of the dam is left 'un-excavated'/ not-deepened/ not disturbed, you could preserve most of the biodiversity within the dam. This way the dam remains a beautiful patch of nature/ natural haven for a diversity of animal species, becomes ‘approachable’ by stock animals in that paddock that may need to drink from it, and best of all, looks fantastic/ a lot more natural than your average ‘drilled into a dust-bowl’-type synthesised farm-dam. This contribution is a bit more ‘pinko’ than the stuff I would normally post, but in this case I felt compelled…
Anyways, good luck with whatever you try,
Cheers, Owen
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Re: DAM REEDS

Postby boylesg » Sat Feb 02, 2008 10:44 am

oproudfoot wrote:I can't really add much to the above advice except to point out that if you go for a 'poisoning' type solution to get rid of the troublesome plants (in this case reeds) in the dam, you are likely to accidentally wipe out some of the species of animals living in the dam as well (turtles, frogs, yabbies, insects etc). Possibly for a long time, depending on the 'half-life' of the chemical you use (which dictates how long it remains 'active'). If however you choose a more 'manual-removal' oriented plan, particularly along the lines of the strategies suggested above whereby the majority of the reeds are manually removed/ the majority of the dam is manually deepened/ excavated BUT a minor section (about 1/3 to 1/4) of the dam is left 'un-excavated'/ not-deepened/ not disturbed, you could preserve most of the biodiversity within the dam. This way the dam remains a beautiful patch of nature/ natural haven for a diversity of animal species, becomes ‘approachable’ by stock animals in that paddock that may need to drink from it, and best of all, looks fantastic/ a lot more natural than your average ‘drilled into a dust-bowl’-type synthesised farm-dam. This contribution is a bit more ‘pinko’ than the stuff I would normally post, but in this case I felt compelled…
Anyways, good luck with whatever you try,
Cheers, Owen

Many in the industry would regard major disturbance of aquatic vegetation as something to avoid due to the degradation of the water quality. As you will know, once clay particles have entered the water column, it is very difficult or impossible to get it to settle out again and the resulting turbid water makes it very difficult for aquatic plants to re-establish due to poor penetration of sunlight.

Aquatic vegetation like reeds also help to floculate clay particles out of the water and so gradual removal of the reeds AND replacement by other aquatic vegetation would be the best strategy to follow - this will also provide competition against the reeds and reduce their spread. You will notice that in water ways where there is abundant aquatic plant growth the water is nearly always a lot clearer than in the average farm dam where the water is like liquid mud. If you 'bulldoze' the reeds in your pond then I suspect you will have very muddy water for a very long time.

Roundup biactive lacks the detergents and other additives that are in Rup Powermax and it is the detergent particularly that is harmful to amphibians and other aquatic life, so I have been told by the experts in the industry. Glyphosate is broken down over several weeks in wet clay soils but may persist for several months in dry sandy soils. In fact glyphosate binds strongly to clay particles and hence, even if it is not broken down immediately, it will be inactivated as soon as combines with clay.

But even so I would still refrain from blasting it willy nilly all over the dam in one hit. As I said you could do any spraying in small stages so that the amount of glyphosate getting into the water is minimal and localised.
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