Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

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Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby steveatmaleny » Sun Mar 23, 2008 11:50 am

I want to build a little ornamental garden in a 3x3m fully-shaded corner just outside a full-length window. Kind of a Asian theme with rocks, pebbles and plants is what I've got in mind. Because it is right up against the house I don't want to use plants that require constant moisture. Any suggestions as to suitable plant varieties would be appreciated. I'm at Maleny in South-East Queensland.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby bubba louie » Sun Mar 23, 2008 12:07 pm

Clivia.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby guzzigirl » Sun Mar 23, 2008 12:10 pm

bromeliads seem popular for that sort of situation too.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby bubba louie » Sun Mar 23, 2008 12:27 pm

guzzigirl wrote:bromeliads seem popular for that sort of situation too.


Some get huge and some like sun, so make sure you get the right one.
Bergenia is another possibility. I grow one here but it doesn't flower as well as down south. You might need to buy it online.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby Undergrounder » Sun Mar 23, 2008 2:55 pm

Yeah go bromeliads, jungle cacti, shade-loving orchids, new guinea impatiens: Phalaenopsis, hang up a Stanhopea, an epiphyllum, aporocactus, zygocactus..
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby bubba louie » Sun Mar 23, 2008 3:48 pm

Undergrounder wrote:Yeah go bromeliads, jungle cacti, shade-loving orchids, new guinea impatiens: Phalaenopsis, hang up a Stanhopea, an epiphyllum, aporocactus, zygocactus..


Epis need good light or they may not flower. If you want to try one don't buy it, they're getting silly prices now. I can give you a few good cuttings, if you don't mind what colour they are.

Epis do need to be kept moist in summer to do well.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby steveatmaleny » Sun Mar 23, 2008 7:12 pm

(Y) Thanks one and all. Your responses are all helpful and have given me some interesting Image Googling for each of phaenopsis stanhopea ephiphyllum aporacactus zygocactus. In the process I was led to a site titled Gardening in the Shade http://gardeningintheshade.com/ where I also found Echeveria Aeonium and Sempervivum. I was surprised because for some strange reason I thought succulents only grew in the sun. These bunching succulents will do part of the job.
Now I need some fine clumping grass to offset the fatness of the succulents.
And something stalky or small-bambooish for some perpendiculars.
And something leafy with a small rounded habit.
All suggestions gratefully received.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby tam » Sun Mar 23, 2008 8:35 pm

Leafy and small rounded habit..............Peperomia. There are some nice small varities.
Small babooish............. Baby panda bamboo or some varieties of ferns.
Clumping grass .............Japenese blood grass.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby bubba louie » Sun Mar 23, 2008 8:50 pm

tam wrote:Leafy and small rounded habit..............Peperomia. There are some nice small varities.
Small babooish............. Baby panda bamboo or some varieties of ferns.
Clumping grass .............Japenese blood grass.


I think Baby Panda likes it moist.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby karyn » Mon Mar 24, 2008 3:58 pm

I'm a little ignorant, but would ferns suit? I think they like it moist, but I have seen them in dry conditions with a small pond to moisten the air a little. I have no idea if this is any help, someone please let me know! I would love to start a small ferned area under my pear tree, so need to do some research. When I have time. Which won't be til this semester ends!!
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby bubba louie » Mon Mar 24, 2008 4:14 pm

karyn wrote:I'm a little ignorant, but would ferns suit? I think they like it moist, but I have seen them in dry conditions with a small pond to moisten the air a little. I have no idea if this is any help, someone please let me know! I would love to start a small ferned area under my pear tree, so need to do some research. When I have time. Which won't be til this semester ends!!


Ferns don't like me, with the possible exception of my King Fern which seems tolerably happy.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby bubba louie » Mon Mar 24, 2008 4:15 pm

Another possibility is the Brazilian Walking Iris. It comes in a few colours, which I can also provide.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby Pam » Mon Mar 24, 2008 4:41 pm

bubba louie wrote:
tam wrote:Leafy and small rounded habit..............Peperomia. There are some nice small varities.
Small babooish............. Baby panda bamboo or some varieties of ferns.
Clumping grass .............Japenese blood grass.


I think Baby Panda likes it moist.

So does Japanese blood grass.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby Pam » Mon Mar 24, 2008 4:45 pm

Steve, what colour is your house, and the gravel that you have in mind to use? These would have some impact on what plants you would use.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby tam » Mon Mar 24, 2008 8:15 pm

My Baby panda grows under the bench in the shade house. It gets watered[run off] from the plants above, once a week.

The Japenese Blood grass is in a clay pot, morning sun and gets watered once a week also. Maybe on hot weeks twice.

Like all gardens some plants have different watering needs.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby Undergrounder » Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:33 pm

What about some bonsai on a couple of raised platforms to set off your oriental theme a bit. Most plants used for bonsai prefer sheltered spots.

ooh ooh! what about a zen garden. The last time i checked, rocks don't need much direct sunlight to just sit there. Picture it... white pebbles, a few stately jagged boulders with some baby's tears growing on them, a couple of little sempervivum islands, a little grass shore at the back, some bamboo up against the wall, a couple of thin stands up the back with a few manicured bonzai on them... you could spend the days meditating on the position of the rocks and try and find the meaning of the universe.
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Re: Small plants for fully-shaded ornamental garden

Postby steveatmaleny » Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:48 pm

pam wrote:Steve, what colour is your house, and the gravel that you have in mind to use? These would have some impact on what plants you would use.


House is still being built. Will be rendered a very light neutral tan, so no problem with colour clashes. I've always had big native gardens before, so this time I thought I'd plant a few of the exotics I've been knocking for all these years. I though I was allergic to exotics. Then along came Broadband and sites like this one, extending my land-locked botanical horizons. This time I might plant an ornamental United Nations garden. Travel the floral universe in my own backyard. Heaven forbid, I might use a heap of those polished pebbles (even the black ones) and glazed pots (even the red ones). No more creeks, frog ponds or water features though; I'm over snakes.
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