Native Water Plants

A Forum for discussion of water gardening including ponds, bogs, bowls, fountains and waterfalls. The scope ranges from design and construction, associated plants, fish and wildlife, maintenance and simple enjoyment.

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Native Water Plants

Postby Longy » Thu Sep 07, 2006 8:45 am

Hi, i have a small dam, (or a large pond, depends how you look at it.) It's about 1.8m deep tapering down from the edges and covers asurface area of about 75m2. I'd like to get some native plants growing in it, i recently scored some native waterlillies, but there doesn't seem to be much else available. I'm not interested in anything which could become a weed as my overflow is part of a creek/gully and i don't want to introduce problems. There are a few different water plants available at nurseries like louisiana irises etc but they are generally introduced exotics and not suitable for my purposes, or the people in the nurseries don't know enough about them to gaurantee they aren't possible weeds. . The local waterways are pretty mongrel too so i can't get ideas from them. Unless you like lantana along the banks...
The water level is maxed out right now thanks to some great rain and there are lots of frogs, turtles, lizards, birds and waterfowl using the water. As well as a bunch of roos and wallabies.
I live Nth coast NSW and so am looking for a specialist in water plants for my area. Any suggestions? Thanks.
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Postby sara » Thu Sep 07, 2006 9:39 am

There are some online pond plant specialists - GE has some plants, I believe, but there was another online place that is absolutely wonderful - but it is a few years siince I have used it, and I simply cannot remember who it was!! They also supplied things like pond snails (and yes they will post them!) as well a wonderful variety of pond plants. Google ... I will see if I can find them again.

eta: nope, no luck- Just google Australian sites only and you may find them yourself. It was just a one man show - had his own pond nursery business run from his bak yard ... pond. ;) The range of his pond plants was extraordinary.
Paradise hangs shadowed in the forgotten corners of gardens.
Come visit Sara and the cats at the restoration project at Nonsuch.
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Postby froglover » Thu Sep 07, 2006 10:36 am

Hi Longy - we have a natural pond as you may know, and I have some Native Nardoo floating in it along with several reeds and rushes. The only thing with the Nardoo is that it can overtake the pond as it grows VERY quickly by runners! I should have planted it in the pot, not into the actual bottom of the pond!

This is what it looks like - very pretty:

Image
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Postby Longy » Thu Sep 07, 2006 6:35 pm

Hey froggy. Yeah i remember you talking about nardoo. I have seen it in its natural habitat in the Cooper Creek and other watercourses in western Qld and SA. It is, i think, more of a shallow water plant. Probably be OK as something around the edges. The main problem with this dam is it is very susceptible to the water table highs and lows. It is rain and spring fed but in dry times the water can get pretty low in a short time due to water tables dropping. So i do need plants which can naturally regenerate when the wet comes again. Nardoo is just such a plant. Thanks.
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Postby Bertha » Thu Sep 07, 2006 7:49 pm

:!: Longy :!:

You made it :!:

Oh, Happy, happy, joy, joy :D :D :mrgreen:
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Postby Bertha » Thu Sep 07, 2006 7:50 pm

FrogLover, is the "Nardoo" the one that looks like a four-leaf clover, with the reddish markings inside?
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Postby Bertha » Thu Sep 07, 2006 7:53 pm

PS Longy, it's me, Dinetta

I had to change my log-in as Dinetta was rejected :oops: , as you may recall :cry:
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Postby bubba louie » Thu Sep 07, 2006 8:42 pm

Here's a fact sheet with some nursery locations.

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s799478.htm
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Postby Longy » Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:36 am

Thanks Bubba. My problem with lots of these is that they can be agents who sell water plants, but don't actually have much insight into their invasive nature. Or not. However, i'll give them a cooee and see what i come up with. (I've actually seen some places selling water plants which are declared noxious or environmental weeds. Strewth!)
What i really need is some webfooted expert who has a passion for these things. Maybe the scribbly mob could have a few suggestions too...
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Postby cordelia » Sat Sep 09, 2006 12:36 am

Longy, you could try your nearest botanic gardens. Brisbane one has lovely watery places. They are usually very keen to give help, esp to someone who wants to be careful of the waterways.
Also local native plant club. Let us know what you find out!
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Postby bubba louie » Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:34 pm

Check out the latest GA mag.
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