Babianas, Freesias, "Lemon Beauty" Naturalised

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Babianas, Freesias, "Lemon Beauty" Naturalised

Postby Lea » Sat Sep 24, 2005 6:35 pm

Another corner of our garden - I love Babianas (purple is my favourite colour!) and I think the purples go very well with yellow Freesias ... and the "Lemon Beauty" Butterfly Daffodils have naturalised here ... their flowers are not as large as the first year they were planted here, but they are a lot more numerous, and the bright white and yellow really draw the eye, I think 8)

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A different time of the day, different shadows -
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"The butterfly does not count years, but moments, and therefore has enough time." - Rabindranath Tagore
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Postby Marrion » Sun Sep 25, 2005 9:36 am

Nice photos, Lea, the purples do make a lovely contrast with the daffodils. What type of Lavender is that?
Have planted Babianas this year but still waiting for them to open.
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Postby Luzy » Sun Sep 25, 2005 7:46 pm

Hi Lea,

Very nice! 8) Your babianas are way ahead of mine as well. I also really like the Chinese lantern (if that's what it is) - it's so bushy! Is that a rose in front of it in the last shot - with the lavender it looks like you've planned for a nice long show! :D
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Postby Lea » Sat Oct 01, 2005 2:12 pm

:D Thanks, Marrion, thanks, Luzy :D

Neither of your babianas are out yet? :o I thought our back garden was one of the last to flower, since we keep getting frost coming down the mountains ;)

Marrion, our lavender is called "Swan River Pink", Lavandula stoechas ... I went and fished out the tag to let you know ;) It was a present from my sister (Y) :D

And yes, Luzy, that's an Abutilon, a Chinese Lantern bush ... I love these, they're so easy to grow, so colourful, and all the birds love to eat their nectar, too (Y) As well as this beautiful maroon one, we've also got an orange, a yellow, and we've just planted a white flowered one too :D And yes, that's a special Just Joey rose that we planted there ... even with hard pruning, it's quadrupled its size in the last two years (Y)
"The butterfly does not count years, but moments, and therefore has enough time." - Rabindranath Tagore
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Postby Luzy » Sat Oct 01, 2005 5:00 pm

Babianas are just starting to break now (though toady's warm weather might have made a difference - haven't had a chance to check on them today...). I am very impressed with your Chinese lantern. Does it flower thorughout the year? It must look wonderful with the Just Joey! :D
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Postby Lea » Sat Oct 01, 2005 10:54 pm

Good news about your babianas, Luzy (Y) We were sitting in the garden today, and noticed that many more babianas have opened just in the last few days ... and a lot more of the blue coloured babiana flowers have opened ;) Yes, I think they like this warm Melbourne weekend 8)

Two years ago I was looking at that piece of fence and thinking how colourless it looked in winter ... we'd put the Just Joey in, but it was winter, of course ;) So I thought about an Abutilon ... love them ... the Chinese Lanterns are fantastic for colour, because they flower for nine or ten months of the year (Y) And the flowers' nectar right through the year is great for the birds, including the indigenous birds too :D
"The butterfly does not count years, but moments, and therefore has enough time." - Rabindranath Tagore
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Postby Pam » Sun Oct 02, 2005 5:43 am

Daffodils have naturalised here ... their flowers are not as large as the first year they were planted here, but they are a lot more numerous,


I wonder if they pehaps need thinning out?

I love Just Joey. If I grew just one rose, it would be Joey!
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Postby Herby » Tue Oct 04, 2005 7:16 pm

lol, it's impressive, but the fact that you's know the names of these plants is even more impressive :D
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Postby Pam » Wed Oct 05, 2005 5:27 am

:lol: Herby, it comes with experience and obsession. :lol:
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Postby Pam » Wed Oct 05, 2005 5:28 am

:idea: I just had a thought, Lea! The one near the gate - it's not an erica?!
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Postby Lea » Fri Oct 07, 2005 11:34 pm

Pam, you might be right about them needing to be thinned out ... I hadn't really thought of that, but - lots of leaves, not as many flowers - they're the key symptoms of daffodils needing to be thinned, I've read 8) And they've been there for four years now, which is about right ;) Good idea, Pam (Y) When we want to thin them, when the leaves have died down completely, is that a good sign that the roots will be dormant too? Or should we wait a little longer for the roots to die back - how much longer after the leaves have gone?

Ben, thanks :lol: It's true, as Pam said, it is experience and obsession ;) If you want to learn the names of plants, just start with one or two at a time ... choose your favourite, discover its name ;) Instead of trying to learn too many at once ;) You'll soon become even more addicted to both horticulture and botany :lol:

Pam, an Erica? That's the botanical name for Heath, is that right? (Being the Victorian emblem, I'd better know that ;) ) Well, it doesn't have the bell-shaped flowers that I'm familiar with of Heath, but maybe you mean a different flowering type? It certainly does have the tiny, pointed, hard leaves of Heath ... hmm ...
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Postby Pam » Sat Oct 08, 2005 5:18 am

Lea, a zillion years ago when I was a florist, we used a type of erica that almost resembled a mass of the softest pink 'balls'. That is what sprang to mind when I saw a closer shot of it in one of your other posts.

The daffodil foliage seems to take FOREVER to die down, and as you no doubt know, there is quite a period of time when they look downright ratty. I think once they've finished blooming, I'd give them a good feed, then just wait it out. Once your foliage has died down you'd be perfectly safe to move them.

Personally, I've dug up bulbs and moved them while they were flowering, with no apparent adverse affects, but I couldn't guarantee that dividing them while they're still in active growth might not cost you next years flowers, so better to go the safe way. :)
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Postby Marrion » Sat Oct 08, 2005 8:46 am

I have also moved flowering daffodils without any adverse affect. Pam's advice is good, feed them now then wait for them to die down.
Am still waiting for my Babianas to flower :( the buds are there but they haven't opened yet, I love them too, I am going to order some more for next season.
I have been waiting for one of my Irises to flower with the last of my Menton tulips for another photo but the wind has ruined the first flower and by the time the second one opens the tulips will be finished.
Pam, you must miss your spring bulbs :( I can't imagine my garden without them.
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Moving bulbs

Postby jack » Mon Oct 10, 2005 2:02 pm

i moved a clump of spring stars out of the way, just dug them up in a nice big mass of soil. i think with a lot of bulbs they are very shallow rooted so wont hurt them, but if you look at the growing chart you can see which bulbs are down deep (daffodils, gladi's, lillies), those would be more of a gamble digging up.
Had a close friend die in september, got a lot of their pot plants given to me, so created a memorial garden out front, a lot of the plants where potted daffodils, they went into the ground and have done alright.
I think with moving, the worst you could do is loose this years flowers and get a weaker flower next year while plant rebuilds energy.
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