New Lawn - Summer Die Back - How's It Work?

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New Lawn - Summer Die Back - How's It Work?

Postby abrogard » Tue Oct 06, 2015 11:04 am

Put a new lawn in couple of months ago.

Now it is dying back with the hot start to spring here.

I was thinking about it. There's a mixture of seeds in these proprietary mixes, isn't there? Presumably to handle different conditions through the year, right? So there'll be winter grass and there'll be summer grass, right? Is that how it works?

So if the winter grass dies back in Spring how's it going to come good next winter? Does it retain vitality in the roots or should there be seeds lying dormant through the hot season? Because there's no seeds. Because I never let it go to seed. It has always been cut short.

So is that right or wrong? Should I have let it run to seed at least once? And should I do that a couple of times each year - once for the summer grasses and once for the winter? To put seed down there for renewal?

Or have I got it all wrong?

And perhaps this kind of modern 'proprietary mix' lawn is totally unnatural and is meant to be preserved in its unnatural state by being watered continually throughout the year? Could that be right?

Can anyone explain the dynamics, the culture of such a lawn to me?
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Re: New Lawn - Summer Die Back - How's It Work?

Postby gardenlen » Fri Oct 09, 2015 4:10 am

g'day,

to slow the process as we really can't stop it unless we waste heaps of water on the lawn - grass, then you will see that yours is always nice and lush and neighbours who don't water theirs turns the same after rain.

the first thing many do is they trim it too short, short top = shallow roots, the second they mow too often and generally when there is no rain on the horizon, this allows for moisture loss from your whole yard believe it or not including the gardens, so more water is needed all round, we won't mow until it has rained significantly + there is more on the way.

we mow at maximum height we use no catcher nor do we rake, any clumping we sweep about so it settles in, and more so now that we are on rural, when neighbours are cutting bowling green style and kicking up dust, no good for the machine our grass looks straggly but green for much longer than theirs does.

neighbours over the back (2) have mowed about 3 times when we have mown once. our grass taller and softer to walk on, here we promote more natural grasses, and encourage nitrogen fixers in the blend, lotonomus, wynnecassia, and when we can clovers, they are drought hardy and good wearing.

take care
With peace and brightest of blessings,

len

--
"Be Content With What You Have And
May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
A World That You May Not Understand."

http://www.lensgarden.com.au
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Re: New Lawn - Summer Die Back - How's It Work?

Postby Pam » Fri Oct 09, 2015 5:52 am

Abrogard, all lawn seeds are different. Some are just one variety, some are a blend. I am guessing from your question that you planted the latter?

To be honest with you, I suspect a freshly planted lawn grass sown 2 months ago from seed will struggle through a hot dry summer if you get no rain and are not supplementary watering. If this is the case for you, you will find any grey water you can divert from the bathroom and laundry will be invaluable in keeping it alive.
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Re: New Lawn - Summer Die Back - How's It Work?

Postby tsmit439 » Thu Nov 16, 2017 3:10 pm

Its hards to keep water up to a lawn but i installed a grey water diverter to use my shower and laundry water on my lawn and its been green ever since ! :D i got it from www.greywatershop.com.au.
mite be worth investing in.
all the best
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Re: New Lawn - Summer Die Back - How's It Work?

Postby abrogard » Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:51 pm

Thanks for the input, all, sorry I didn't see it sooner... must have missed the notification email...

We've moved from there so I can't report on how it worked out nor watch what happens.

But I can report that before we left things were looking so bad that I sowed 50 or 60 kikuyu runners.

My thoughts are that if the lawn is not watered then a Bunnings ( for instance ) seed mix will do this:

If not left to seed or doesn't get enough time to seed then the winter grass will die back as soon as it gets too hot.

Being really 'too hot' and the grass being young and there being no seed it'll die down at root level, too. It'll be gone.

The later grass seeds in the mix - the summer grasses - will sprout if there's summer rains and if there's enough rain thereafter they'll succeed. If they are not left to go to seed they'll die back when it gets too cold and wet for them.

I don't know what might happen to their root structure but I'm ready to believe it'll be rotted by the wet, eaten by fungus, parasites, whatever. They'll be gone.

In short I'm thinking a proprietary lawn seed mix will die after one 'cycle', one year, unless fed artificially with mucho water.

Hence they're no good to me. I'm not into watered lawns. Not on a regular basis.

:)
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Re: New Lawn - Summer Die Back - How's It Work?

Postby tsmit439 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:25 am

The seed you buy from bunnings will contain several verities yes mostly to give you a fast establishment and stop erosion, but unless you water 2 times a day for the first week or so then easing back to keeping it always moist you will have die back. you could try finding seed that is not a mix that way you can get a variety like blue cooch that will deal with dry winters a bit better and get it established. other :D
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